Crisis & Emergency Services

    Results: 33

  • Ambulance Services (2)
    LD-1500.0600

    Ambulance Services

    LD-1500.0600

    Programs that provide ground vehicles which transport acutely ill or injured individuals to health care facilities for treatment or from one health care facility to another for specialized care. Ambulances are equipped and staffed to provide medical care during transit and, in communities where the municipality contracts with the company as their emergency medical service provider, are dispatched when residents contact 911 with a medical emergency, not accessed directly. Depending on the terms of the contract, the ambulance company may be the municipality's primary first responder, may serve in a backup capacity when the city's service is busy or may handle the transport component of the service while the city's paramedic/EMT service functions as the first responder. Ambulance companies may also provide emergency transport for people who want to go somewhere other than where the municipality's emergency medical service is authorized to take them; and offer non-emergency transportation for individuals/institutions that contact them directly, e.g., transportation for patients from one hospital to another, to nursing homes or other special-care centers, on intercity trips and from the hospital to their homes.
  • Child Abuse Hotlines (10)
    RP-1500.1400-150

    Child Abuse Hotlines

    RP-1500.1400-150

    Programs that provide immediate assistance for parents who have abused or fear they may abuse their children with the objective of defusing the parent's anger and frustration and ensuring the child's future safety through referrals for ongoing support and treatment. Also included may be services for abused children and concerned others who are in need of advice, guidance and/or emotional support. Hotline staff are generally available via the telephone, email, live chat, texting and/or instant message (IM).
  • Child Abuse Reporting/Emergency Response (5)
    PH-6500.1500-140

    Child Abuse Reporting/Emergency Response

    PH-6500.1500-140

    Programs that accept and respond to reports of child abuse or neglect. Services include assessment of the initial referral, assignment of an appropriate response time, consultation with the family to determine the nature of the problem and do initial case planning, and emergency placement services if the child is removed from the family by the police.
  • Clothing (8)
    BM-6500.1500

    Clothing

    BM-6500.1500

    Programs that pay for or provide new or secondhand clothing. Included are clothing exchange programs.
  • Crisis Intervention (19)
    RP-1500

    Crisis Intervention

    RP-1500

    Programs that provide immediate assistance for people who are in acute emotional distress; who are or perceive themselves to be in life-threatening situations; who are a danger to themselves or to others; or who are hysterical, frightened or otherwise unable to cope with a problem that requires immediate action. The objective of crisis intervention is to defuse the critical nature of the situation, ensure the person's safety, and return the individual to a state of equilibrium in which he or she is capable of identifying and seeking solutions to the problem.
  • Crisis Intervention Hotlines/Helplines (7)
    RP-1500.1400

    Crisis Intervention Hotlines/Helplines

    RP-1500.1400

    Programs that provide immediate access to support and advice for people who are in distress with the objective of defusing the emotional impact of the crisis, ensuring the person's safety and helping the person to take the next steps toward resolving the problem. Hotlines/helplines are generally staffed by trained volunteers who are available via the telephone, email, live chat, texting and/or instant message (IM).
  • Crisis Residential Treatment (7)
    RP-1500.1500

    Crisis Residential Treatment

    RP-1500.1500

    Programs that provide a short-term residential alternative to inpatient hospitalization for adults and/or children who are experiencing a mental health crisis and require 24-hour support in a supervised environment to become stabilized, but do not exhibit medical complications that necessitate nursing care.
  • Domestic Violence Hotlines (11)
    RP-1500.1400-200

    Domestic Violence Hotlines

    RP-1500.1400-200

    Programs that provide immediate assistance for women and men who have experienced domestic abuse which may include steps to ensure the person's safety; short-term emotional support; assistance with shelter; legal information and advocacy; referrals for medical treatment; ongoing counseling and/or group support; and other related services. Hotline staff are generally available via the telephone, email, live chat, texting and/or instant message (IM).
  • Domestic Violence Shelters (7)
    BH-1800.1500-100

    Domestic Violence Shelters

    BH-1800.1500-100

    Programs that provide temporary emergency shelter for women who have experienced domestic violence/abuse, and for their children. Such facilities usually provide in-house individual, group and family counseling and the full range of secondary services related to domestic violence including referral to appropriate resources. Also included are similar facilities for battered men and those that can accommodate both men and women.
  • Electric Service Payment Assistance (10)
    BV-8900.9300-180

    Electric Service Payment Assistance

    BV-8900.9300-180

    Programs that pay all or a portion of the electric service expenses of people whose electricity has been or is at risk of being shut off. Also included are non-emergency programs like those funded through the federal Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP), also referred to as LIEAP or HEAP in some states, that provide home energy assistance, generally in the form of a credit, for low-income households that apply. The assistance is usually available once per calendar year (or heating season). Electric service payment assistance programs may have age, income, disability, need or other eligibility requirements.
  • Emergency Funds (2)
    TB-0700.2200-170

    Emergency Funds

    TB-0700.2200-170

    Foundations and other funding organizations that provide monetary support which recipient agencies may use to fund short-term needs in emergency situations (e.g., the temporary loss of an ongoing source of income).
  • Emergency Shelter (1)
    BH-1800

    Emergency Shelter

    BH-1800

    Programs that provide a temporary or transitional place to stay for newcomers, people who are in crisis, or homeless individuals in the community.
  • Extreme Cold Weather Shelters (1)
    BH-1800.8500-185

    Extreme Cold Weather Shelters

    BH-1800.8500-185

    Programs that provide overnight accommodations during times of extreme cold for people who are temporarily at risk of exposure due to being homeless.
  • Food Pantries (2)
    BD-1800.2000

    Food Pantries

    BD-1800.2000

    Programs that acquire food products through donations, canned food drives, food bank programs or direct purchase and distribute the food to people who are in emergency situations. Some pantries deliver food to people whose disabilities or illnesses make it difficult for them to leave home.
  • Food Stamps/SNAP (1)
    NL-6000.2000

    Food Stamps/SNAP

    NL-6000.2000

    A federally-funded program administered locally by the county or the state that enables low-income and indigent households to obtain an electronic benefit transfer (EBT) card similar to a bank debit card which can be used in most grocery stores to purchase food. Approved households are entitled to purchase a designated amount of food utilizing their cards based on net income and household size. Benefits are generally available in an EBT account within 30 days from the date an application was filed. Expedited food stamps are available within seven days for people who are in an emergency situation and whose income and spendable resources for that month are within specified limits.
  • Food Stamps/SNAP Applications (54)
    NL-6000.2000-220

    Food Stamps/SNAP Applications

    NL-6000.2000-220

    County or state offices that accept Food Stamp applications, determine eligibility for the Food Stamp program and allotments, and issue Food Stamp EBT cards which are presented at the grocery checkout counter when purchasing food. Certified households receive their EBT card and instructions for setting up a PIN number within 30 days of the date their application was filed. Expedited food stamps are available within seven days for people who are in an emergency situation and whose income and spendable resources for that month are within specified limits. Also included are other programs that help people prepare and file Food Stamp/SNAP applications and/or are authorized to do eligibility determinations for the program.
  • Gas Service Payment Assistance (8)
    BV-8900.9300-250

    Gas Service Payment Assistance

    BV-8900.9300-250

    Programs that pay all or a portion of the gas service expenses of people whose gas has been or is at risk of being shut off. Also included are non-emergency programs like those funded through the federal Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP), also referred to as LIEAP or HEAP in some states, that provide home energy assistance, generally in the form of a credit, for low-income households that apply. The assistance is usually available once per calendar year (or heating season). Gas service payment assistance programs may have age, income, disability, need or other eligibility requirements.
  • Homeless Drop In Centers (5)
    BH-1800.3500

    Homeless Drop In Centers

    BH-1800.3500

    Centers where homeless people can spend time during the day or evening. Services may include counseling and/or medication monitoring on a formal or informal basis; personal hygiene supplies; facilities for showering, shaving, napping, laundering clothes, making necessary telephone calls or attending to other personal needs; and other basic supportive services. Some centers may also provide meals or facilities for cooking. Programs that focus on homeless youth may provide case management, living skills training, family reunification assistance, classes and other educational supports, pre-employment training, health education (including HIV prevention), help in obtaining valid ID and other services that help youth successfully exit street life and transition to independent living.
  • Homeless Shelter (15)
    BH-1800.8500

    Homeless Shelter

    BH-1800.8500

    Programs that provide a temporary place to stay (usually three days to two weeks), generally in dormitory-style facilities with very little privacy, for people who have no permanent housing. Also included are programs that provide motel vouchers for people who are homeless.
  • In Person Crisis Intervention (48)
    RP-1500.3300

    In Person Crisis Intervention

    RP-1500.3300

    Programs that provide an opportunity for people who are emotionally distressed and/or for their significant others to meet face-to-face with someone who has been trained to assess and resolve the immediate crisis, if possible, and to link the person with appropriate resources for ongoing assistance.
  • Involuntary Psychiatric Intervention (1)
    RP-1500.3400

    Involuntary Psychiatric Intervention

    RP-1500.3400

    Programs that provide a mechanism for mobile emergency response in situations where an individual's mental or emotional condition results in behavior which constitutes an imminent danger to him or herself or to another and the person is unwilling to seek voluntary treatment. The program conducts an immediate assessment of the psychological condition and functioning of the individual and can issue an order which authorizes involuntary hospitalization for a specified period of time for the purposes of observation and treatment. A request for intervention can be made by family members, community residents and/or community agencies.
  • Occasional Emergency Food Assistance (23)
    BD-1800.2000-620

    Occasional Emergency Food Assistance

    BD-1800.2000-620

    Food pantries that provide a box or bag of groceries on a one-time only or other limited basis for people who are unable to provide food for themselves or their families. Included are programs that provide enough food for an entire balanced meal or series of meals and those that provide a supplemental supply of groceries. Some programs deliver food to people whose disabilities or illnesses make it difficult for them to leave home.
  • Ongoing Emergency Food Assistance (266)
    BD-1800.2000-640

    Ongoing Emergency Food Assistance

    BD-1800.2000-640

    Programs that provide an ongoing supply of groceries, usually once a month, for people whose income is not sufficient to meet their needs. Included are programs that provide enough food for an entire balanced meal or series of meals and those that provide a supplemental supply of groceries. Some programs deliver food to people whose disabilities or illnesses make it difficult for them to leave home.
  • Paramedic/EMT Services (1)
    LD-6500

    Paramedic/EMT Services

    LD-6500

    Programs that utilize trained medical technicians who assist in rescue operations and provide preliminary emergency medical treatment for individuals who are acutely ill or injured on the scene and/or during transit to a health care facility. There are four levels of EMTs, the highest being paramedics who are permitted to administer drugs orally and intravenously, interpret electrocardiograms (EKGs), perform endotracheal intubations and use monitors and other complex equipment. In most communities, paramedic/EMT services are structured as separate entities on a par with police and fire departments, are organized as a branch of another municipal department, such as the public health department, or are integrated into the operations of another municipal emergency service such as the local fire department or police department. Under the latter model, personnel may be cross-trained to perform both functions. Paramedics/EMTs are dispatched when residents contact 911 with a medical emergency and are not accessed directly.
  • Psychiatric Emergency Room Care (1)
    RP-1500.6750

    Psychiatric Emergency Room Care

    RP-1500.6750

    Psychiatric and health care facilities that are capable of restraining and treating people who are in acute emotional distress on a 24-hour basis.
  • Psychiatric Mobile Response Teams (1)
    RP-1500.3400-650

    Psychiatric Mobile Response Teams

    RP-1500.3400-650

    Mobile psychiatric emergency teams composed of designated mental health workers (psychiatrists, RN's, MSW's, psychologists, psychiatric technicians) in any combination which intervene in situations where an individual's mental or emotional condition results in behavior which constitutes an imminent danger to him or herself or to another and is unwilling to seek voluntary treatment. These teams are generally operated by county mental health agencies and have the authority to issue an order which authorizes involuntary inpatient hospitalization for up to 72 hours.
  • Runaway/Homeless Youth Helplines (3)
    RP-1500.1400-700

    Runaway/Homeless Youth Helplines

    RP-1500.1400-700

    Programs that provide immediate assistance for children and youth who have run away from or have been pushed out of their homes or who are acting out and at risk of abuse. Included may be steps to ensure the youth's safety, information regarding the youth's rights and alternatives, and referrals for shelter, medical care, ongoing counseling or group support and other related services. Also included are programs that maintain a message relay system which allows runaways to contact their parents or other concerned individuals and receive messages from them. Helpline staff are generally available via the telephone, email, live chat, texting and/or instant message (IM).
  • Runaway/Youth Shelters (3)
    BH-1800.1500-700

    Runaway/Youth Shelters

    BH-1800.1500-700

    Programs that provide temporary emergency shelter for children and youth who have run away from or have been pushed out of their homes or who are acting out and at risk for abuse pending return to their own families or suitable alternative placement. Such facilities usually provide in-house individual, group and family counseling and the full range of other secondary services related to runaways including referral to appropriate resources.
  • Sack Lunches/Dinners (7)
    BD-1800.8000

    Sack Lunches/Dinners

    BD-1800.8000

    Programs that provide lunch or dinner in a small bag for people who would not otherwise have a meal. The program may target homeless or low-income people or other specific groups.
  • Sexual Assault Hotlines (6)
    RP-1500.1400-750

    Sexual Assault Hotlines

    RP-1500.1400-750

    Programs that provide immediate assistance for people who are survivors of rape, incest and other forms of sexual assault which may include steps to ensure the person's safety, short-term emotional support, information regarding the person's rights and alternatives, and referrals and/or accompaniment to resources for medical, legal and emotional needs, advocacy and other related services. Hotline staff are generally available via the telephone, email, live chat, texting and/or instant message (IM).
  • Suicide Prevention Hotlines (5)
    RP-1500.1400-800

    Suicide Prevention Hotlines

    RP-1500.1400-800

    Programs that provide immediate assistance for individuals who are having suicidal feelings with the objective of helping them explore alternatives to self-harm or self-destruction. Suicide prevention workers establish and maintain contact with the individual while identifying and clarifying the focal problem, evaluate the suicidal potential, assess the individual's strengths and resources, and mobilize available resources including paramedic or police intervention and emergency psychiatric care as needed. These programs can also help individuals who are worried about the potentially suicidal behavior of another with the objective of helping them identify warning signs and provide options on seeking further help. Hotline staff are generally available via the telephone, email, live chat, texting and/or instant message (IM).
  • Transitional Housing/Shelter (37)
    BH-8600

    Transitional Housing/Shelter

    BH-8600

    Programs that provide extended shelter and supportive services primarily for homeless individuals and/or families with the goal of helping them live independently and transition into permanent housing. Some programs require that the individual/family be transitioning from a short-term emergency shelter. The length of stay varies considerably by program. It is generally longer than two weeks but typically 60 days or more and, in many cases, up to two years or more. The supportive services may be provided directly by the organization managing the housing or may be coordinated by them and provided by other public or private agencies. Transitional housing/shelter is generally provided in apartment style facilities with a higher degree of privacy than short-term homeless shelters; may be provided at no cost to the resident; and may be configured for specialized groups within the homeless population such as people with substance abuse problems, homeless mentally ill, homeless domestic violence victims, veterans or homeless people with AIDS/HIV. In some cases, a "transition in place" option allows families to continue living in the same complex (if not the same unit) where their transitional housing unit is located when they are ready to move to permanent housing. In other cases, the permanent housing option is either public housing or private rental housing supported by a tenant-based voucher subsidy. Included are post-domestic violence shelter housing programs that make affordable rental housing (or other accommodations) available to women, generally those who are coming directly out of a domestic violence shelter or other crisis shelter, often in apartment complexes owned by the shelter; and programs that provide transitional housing and support services for other targeted groups such as military and veteran families and others who need a temporary supportive living environment to maintain stability and begin to thrive.
  • Utility Service Payment Assistance (2)
    BV-8900.9300

    Utility Service Payment Assistance

    BV-8900.9300

    Programs that pay all or a portion of the utility bills of people whose utilities have been or are at risk of being shut off. Also included are non-emergency programs like those funded through the federal Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP), also referred to as LIEAP or HEAP in some states, that provide home energy assistance, generally in the form of a credit, for low-income households that apply. The assistance is usually available once per calendar year (or heating season). Utility bill payment assistance programs may have age, income, disability, need or other eligibility requirements.
 
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