• Human-Translated Fact Sheets and Video
  • Large Print

Children, Parents & Families

    Results: 197

  • Abuse Counseling (14)
    RP-1400.8000-020

    Abuse Counseling

    RP-1400.8000-020

    Programs that provide individual, conjoint, family or group treatment for people who are experiencing physical, sexual, emotional and/or other forms of abuse in the context a marital, parental, sibling or other family relationship or, in some instances, outside the family. Included are programs that provide therapeutic interventions for perpetrators and/or for individuals who have been victimized.
  • Adolescent Psychiatric Inpatient Units (3)
    RM-3300.6600-050

    Adolescent Psychiatric Inpatient Units

    RM-3300.6600-050

    Programs offered in special units of general acute care hospitals that provide diagnostic and treatment services for adolescents, usually age 12 or 13 through 17 who have acute psychiatric disorders, require hospitalization for maximum benefit, and who may be a threat to themselves, to their families or to others if left in the community or placed in a less restrictive treatment setting. Services may include a comprehensive evaluation; 24-hour care in a supportive, therapeutic environment; counseling for the patient and family; adjunctive therapies as needed; medication, if required; and an aftercare program following discharge.
  • Adolescent/Youth Counseling (50)
    RP-1400.8000-050

    Adolescent/Youth Counseling

    RP-1400.8000-050

    Programs that specialize in the treatment of adolescents, usually age 12 or 13 through 17, who have adjustment problems, behavior problems, emotional disturbance, a personality disorder or incipient mental illness. The programs may help youth troubled by low self-esteem, social isolation, peer pressure, bullying, school performance issues, truancy, anger management issues, family problems, grief and loss, sexual promiscuity, sexually transmitted disease, alcohol or drug addiction, eating disorders, oppositional and defiant behaviors, depression and anxiety, suicidal thoughts or other difficult issues.
  • Adoption and Foster/Kinship Care Support Groups (8)
    PN-8100.6500-030

    Adoption and Foster/Kinship Care Support Groups

    PN-8100.6500-030

    Mutual support groups whose members are individuals who have adopted a child or are considering or in the process of adoption, birth parents who relinquished a child for adoption, people who were, themselves adopted, foster care providers, children in foster care, kinship caregivers (paternal or maternal grandparents, aunts, uncles and other family members, members of a child's tribe or clan, godparents, stepparents, neighbors, friends of the family or other adults who can serve as "family"), children cared for by relatives under a formal or informal kinship care arrangement and/or adults who, as children, were raised in foster or kinship care. Groups may also be structured for adoptees, siblings and/or birth parents who have been reunited; older kinship caregivers who have taken on an unexpected parenting role later in life; and people who have other kinship issues, e.g., grandparents and other relatives who have been denied access to a grandchild or other youngster due to a death or divorce in the child's family. Meeting formats may include in-person, telephone or Internet options.
  • Adoption Counseling and Support (10)
    PH-0300.0300

    Adoption Counseling and Support

    PH-0300.0300

    Programs that provide guidance and support for people who have adopted a child or are involved in the process of adopting a child.
  • Adoption Evaluation/Placement (5)
    PH-0300.0350

    Adoption Evaluation/Placement

    PH-0300.0350

    Programs that assess the needs and capabilities of children who have been relinquished for adoption, compile the children's social and medical histories, make arrangements for care and supervision of the children prior to placement, evaluate prospective adoptive applicants including a review of adoptive home studies, if available, and select and approve prospective adoptive homes.
  • Adoption Services (1)
    PH-0300

    Adoption Services

    PH-0300

    Programs that participate in arranging permanent homes under new legal parentage for individuals whose birth parents are unable or unwilling to provide for their care. Included are programs that provide counseling and assistance for people who decide to relinquish their children for adoption or arrange for an independent adoption; which recruit, select, counsel and match suitable adoptive parents with children who have been relinquished; which assist in the adoption of stepchildren, adults or foreign-born children; which provide foster care for children who have been relinquished for adoption but not yet placed; and/or which assist people who are adopted to locate their birth parents and birth parents to locate the children they relinquished.
  • Adult High School Diploma Programs (28)
    HH-0500.2500-050

    Adult High School Diploma Programs

    HH-0500.2500-050

    Programs that offer a series of courses that are especially designed for adults who have not completed their high school education which focus on life skills necessary for personal and job success. The instructional components in the program include reading, writing, listening, speaking, mathematics, participatory democracy and consumer awareness as well as health, home, personal and family relationships, academic and/or vocational specializations and advanced studies. Individuals who successfully complete the program receive a high school diploma.
  • Adult/Child Mentoring Programs (13)
    PH-1400.5000-100

    Adult/Child Mentoring Programs

    PH-1400.5000-100

    Programs like Big Brothers or Big Sisters which provide male or female adult companionship, guidance and/or role models for young men or women who are from families in which adult figures of the same sex are absent or available on a limited and inadequate basis or who are troubled and at risk for delinquency. Also included are programs in which people in their teens provide companionship for younger children.
  • Alternative Education (6)
    HD-0500

    Alternative Education

    HD-0500

    Educational programs at all levels within or outside the formal education system that provide innovative and flexible instruction, curriculums, grading systems, learning environments or degree requirements, a return to traditional educational values, or other alternatives to the ordinary system of instruction.
  • Animal Licenses (11)
    PD-0700.0600

    Animal Licenses

    PD-0700.0600

    Programs that issue licenses for domestic animals who are subject to regulation. Annual licensing is required for dogs of a specified age (rabies certificates are usually required) and, frequently, for equines (horses, mules, ponies, donkeys, burros) who reside in some areas. Optional identification tags are available for cats and are usually valid for the lifetime of the animal. Licensing fees are usually reduced for neutered dogs or dogs who are certified by a veterinarian as being unable to reproduce; dog guides may receive permanent licenses for a very nominal fee. In many jurisdictions, special licenses may be required for people keeping exotic pets (e.g. tigers, wolves) that may require special conditions and/or pose a possible risk to the public if not properly secured.
  • Arts and Crafts Instruction (6)
    PL-7400.0500

    Arts and Crafts Instruction

    PL-7400.0500

    Programs that provide classes, individual lessons or other opportunities for people who want to learn or perfect their skills and techniques in any of a variety of visual art forms or crafts.
  • Baby Clothing (13)
    BM-6500.1500-100

    Baby Clothing

    BM-6500.1500-100

    Programs that pay for or provide new or secondhand clothing and layettes for infants and young children.
  • Bereaved Child Support Groups (3)
    PN-8100.1000-080

    Bereaved Child Support Groups

    PN-8100.1000-080

    Mutual support groups whose members are children and youth who have experienced the loss of a parent, sibling or other relative and need the emotional support of the group to alleviate feelings of isolation and a sense of responsibility for the loss. The groups may meet in-person, by telephone or via the Internet.
  • Bereaved Parent Support Groups (1)
    PN-8100.1000-100

    Bereaved Parent Support Groups

    PN-8100.1000-100

    Mutual support groups whose members are parents who have experienced the loss of a child due to a miscarriage or stillbirth, or through illness or accident in infancy, during childhood or later in life. The groups meet in-person, by telephone or via the Internet; and focus on helping participants accept their loss, express their grief, move through the bereavement process and put their lives back together. Included are groups for parents who have lost a child to sudden infant death syndrome, or whose children have been murdered.
  • Birth Control Counseling (104)
    LJ-2000.1000-100

    Birth Control Counseling

    LJ-2000.1000-100

    Programs that provide a comprehensive overview of available birth control methods including information about fertility cycles, natural family planning, contraception and sterilization, and help people evaluate their options and select the method that bests suits their needs.
  • Bookmobiles (32)
    TJ-4500.1200

    Bookmobiles

    TJ-4500.1200

    Large motor vehicles especially equipped to carry books and other library materials that travel to communities which do not have immediate access to a nearby library.
  • Boys/Girls Clubs (37)
    PS-9800.1000

    Boys/Girls Clubs

    PS-9800.1000

    Programs that provide a wide range of supervised recreational activities and delinquency prevention services for children and youth of all ages and backgrounds, but particularly for disadvantaged youth, through membership in boys and/or girls clubs. Club members are entitled to use recreational facilities and may have access to counseling, tutorial services, employment assistance, gang programs, drug abuse and alcoholism prevention and other activities and services that direct their energies toward positive social goals and facilitate healthy personality development.
  • Breastfeeding Support Programs (103)
    LJ-5000.1000

    Breastfeeding Support Programs

    LJ-5000.1000

    Programs that provide information and instruction concerning appropriate techniques for nursing an infant for expectant parents or new mothers.
  • Bullying Prevention (2)
    FN-1500.1000

    Bullying Prevention

    FN-1500.1000

    Programs that attempt to reduce the incidence of bullying, a form of violence among children, on school playgrounds, in neighborhoods, in homes and on the Internet, through a variety of interventions which may include use of an anonymous questionnaire to assess the nature and prevalence of the problem, development and announcement of an intervention program, open discussions of bullying at school and in other venues, increased supervision of children in areas that are "hotspots" for bullying, arrangements for reporting bullying incidents, immediate intervention when bullying incidents occur, development of protective strategies for targets, formation of support groups for victims of bullies, discussions with parents of involved students, and engagement of community members in support of the program. Most bullying prevention programs are school based and target students in elementary, middle and junior high schools. Bullying can be physical, verbal, or psychological; and involves intentional, repeated hurtful acts, words and other behavior such as name-calling, threatening or shunning committed by one or more children against another.
  • Caregiver/Care Receiver Support Groups (18)
    PN-8100.1400

    Caregiver/Care Receiver Support Groups

    PN-8100.1400

    Mutual support groups whose members are family, friends, significant others, non-familial caregivers or attendants who are caring for someone who has a temporary, chronic, life-threatening or terminal illness or disability or who is elderly and increasingly unable to provide for his or her own care. The groups meet in-person, by telephone or via the Internet; and provide emotional support, information and resources to help participants ensure their own well-being while remaining involved in the intense care of a loved one. Also included are care receiver support groups that help people who have a caregiver cope with the fact that they require care. Care receiver support groups are often offered in conjunction with caregiver support groups and are structured to allow care receivers to participate in their own group while their caregiver attends another.
  • Charter Schools (2)
    HD-0500.1500

    Charter Schools

    HD-0500.1500

    Elementary or secondary schools that are operated by a nonprofit board under a contractual arrangement with a state education authority, public university, community college, intermediate school district or local school district. Charter schools can operate any combination of grades from kindergarten through 12th grade, can specialize in a specific subject area or approach, may be required to meet specialized accountability standards and/or to abide by the same laws and regulations that govern public schools, and cannot charge tuition.
  • Child Abuse Counseling (11)
    RP-1400.8000-020.15

    Child Abuse Counseling

    RP-1400.8000-020.15

    Programs that provide therapeutic interventions for individuals and/or families who are experiencing child abuse including abandonment, neglect, or emotional, physical or sexual abuse by a parent, guardian, or other family or extended family member whom the child trusts and who is in a position of power over the child. Counseling is offered in a variety of settings and may include individual, conjoint, family and group therapy sessions for the child, the abusing or non-abusing parent(s) and siblings. Separate sessions may be available for young children who have been victimized and for older children in their teens.
  • Child Abuse Hotlines (9)
    RP-1500.1400-150

    Child Abuse Hotlines

    RP-1500.1400-150

    Programs that provide immediate assistance for parents who have abused or fear they may abuse their children with the objective of defusing the parent's anger and frustration and ensuring the child's future safety through referrals for ongoing support and treatment. Also included may be services for abused children and concerned others who are in need of advice, guidance and/or emotional support. Hotline staff are generally available via the telephone, email, live chat, texting and/or instant message (IM).
  • Child Abuse Medical Evaluations (1)
    LF-7000.1550

    Child Abuse Medical Evaluations

    LF-7000.1550

    Hospitals and clinics with multidisciplinary teams that conduct historical interviews and physical examinations of children to determine whether there are injuries or other forms of physical evidence that are consistent with neglect, emotional deprivation/failure to thrive, or physical or sexual abuse that constitute the battered child syndrome. Historical information supplied by the child in the medical interview may be used to establish a case for child abuse even in the absence of physical evidence.
  • Child Abuse Prevention (15)
    FN-1500.1900-150

    Child Abuse Prevention

    FN-1500.1900-150

    Programs, often offered in the schools or in other community settings, that attempt to protect children from physical, sexual and/or emotional abuse or exploitation through a variety of educational interventions which may focus on children of various ages, parents, people who work with children and/or the community at large. The sessions may offer suggestions for children and/or parents regarding ways of avoiding or handling an abusive or potentially abusive situation and/or information about the indicators and incidence of abuse, requirements for reporting abuse and community resources that are available to children who have been abused and to their families.
  • Child and Adult Care Food Programs (1)
    BD-5000.1450

    Child and Adult Care Food Programs

    BD-5000.1450

    A program that provides supplementary nutrition in the form of healthy meals and snacks for preschool and school-age children and adults receiving day care. Licensed child care centers, Head Start programs, family day care homes, adult day care centers and homeless shelters serving families are eligible to participate and are reimbursed for a portion of the meals served. In the United States, the program is administered at the federal level by the Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) of the U.S. Department of Agriculture.
  • Child Care Centers (44)
    PH-1250.1400

    Child Care Centers

    PH-1250.1400

    Programs that are licensed to provide supervised care within designated facilities for children during some portion of a 24-hour day. Staff for approved day care centers must meet defined educational requirements; the program must ensure specified adult/child ratios; and the facility must meet building, fire and zoning codes. Services may include recreational and developmental activities and snacks and/or meals, as appropriate.
  • Child Care Complaints (1)
    DD-1500.1500

    Child Care Complaints

    DD-1500.1500

    Programs that accept and, where possible, attempt to resolve complaints regarding individuals and organizations that provide child care services. Included are complaints concerning licensing, cleanliness and safety of homes or facilities, treatment of children, quality of care, excessive fees, unethical or improper conduct of personnel or other inappropriate business practices of child care providers.
  • Child Care Cooperatives (1)
    PH-1250.1600

    Child Care Cooperatives

    PH-1250.1600

    Programs in which parents exchange hours of work in the child care setting for either free child care or reduced child care fees. Child care co-ops usually cannot provide more than 25 hours per week of child care for any one member because parents must provide as much child care as they receive.
  • Child Care Expense Assistance (32)
    NL-3000.1500

    Child Care Expense Assistance

    NL-3000.1500

    Programs that cover all or part of the cost of child care in public and licensed private child care centers or private family child care homes, usually for low-income families or families which include children with disabilities in situations where parents are working, in school or in a training program. Also included are programs that pay the costs of in-home or out-of-home child care when the parent is receiving diagnostic tests, undergoing medical treatment, is hospitalized or needs to be out of the house for other reasons; and those that provide financial assistance to families with young children to help cover some of the costs of a parent staying home to care for their child.
  • Child Care Instruction (5)
    JR-8200.1500

    Child Care Instruction

    JR-8200.1500

    Programs that provide training for individuals who want to become qualified as occasional baby sitters or child care professionals, and who need information regarding rules, regulations, accepted practices and available resources.
  • Child Care Issues (1)
    YZ-1470

    Child Care Issues

    YZ-1470

    Programs that provide information and/or services that deal with the topic of child care.
  • Child Care Provider Licensing (1)
    DF-4500.2000-130

    Child Care Provider Licensing

    DF-4500.2000-130

    Programs that establish and enforce health, safety and program standards for child care facilities including child care centers and family child care homes, review applications for licenses, issue or deny licenses, inspect facilities for compliance with requirements and revoke licenses or bring disciplinary action for noncompliance.
  • Child Care Provider Referrals (5)
    PH-2400.1500

    Child Care Provider Referrals

    PH-2400.1500

    Programs that provide statewide and community-based services that are designed to improve the availability and quality of child care. These programs maintain lists of child care resources and link families who are in need of child care services with child care centers, licensed family child care homes and other organization-based providers; provide information that helps families become good consumers of child care services; recruit new child care providers to expand the availability of the service locally; provide training and technical assistance for providers; and collect and disseminate data which document the demand for child care services and the current availability of child care resources. Some programs may also make referrals to preschools and many provide referrals to children's play groups.
  • Child Care Provider Training (2)
    JR-8200.1500-150

    Child Care Provider Training

    JR-8200.1500-150

    Programs that provide pre-service or in-service training for individuals entering or currently involved in the delivery of child care services in any of a variety of child care settings. The training may focus on the elements of a safe and healthy environment, childhood development, behavior management, inclusion of children with special needs and developmentally appropriate practices.
  • Child Care Providers (1)
    PH-1250

    Child Care Providers

    PH-1250

    Programs that provide substitute parental care in a group setting for children during some portion of a 24-hour day. Services may include recreational and developmental activities and snacks and/or meals as appropriate.
  • Child Custody/Visitation Assistance (11)
    FT-3000.1500

    Child Custody/Visitation Assistance

    FT-3000.1500

    Programs that provide assistance for people who want to obtain custody of their children as a part of a divorce or separation action, who want to appeal all or a portion of the terms of a previous child custody decision, or in the case of a noncustodial parent, who want to establish or appeal the terms of a visitation award or a court-ordered visitation schedule. Included are programs that provide child custody/visitation assistance for people who are not legally married but have children together.
  • Child Development Classes (11)
    PH-6100.1500

    Child Development Classes

    PH-6100.1500

    Programs that offer classes for parents or for parents and their children that focus on the developmental stages of maturation from infancy through adolescence and the child rearing problems that arise with each stage. Classes may be purely instructional or may include an experiential element in which parents bring their infants or toddlers to class and observe their behavior as an example of the specific material being discussed.
  • Child Guardianship Assistance (5)
    FT-6900.2500-150

    Child Guardianship Assistance

    FT-6900.2500-150

    Programs that provide assistance for people who are in favor of or want to oppose the appointment of a guardian to care for and/or manage the affairs of a child or adolescent during minority. The court may appoint a guardian of the person in situations where there is no parent to meet the child's needs due to death, incapacity, abandonment, military service or other reasons; and/or a guardian of the child's estate. In the latter situation, the guardian is given responsibility for managing the child's funds, collecting and making an inventory of the child's assets, keeping accurate financial records, and regularly filing financial accountings with the court.
  • Child Guidance (7)
    RP-1400.8000-155

    Child Guidance

    RP-1400.8000-155

    Programs that specialize in the treatment of children from infancy to age 12 who have adjustment problems, behavior problems, emotional disturbances, a personality disorder or incipient mental illness.
  • Child Identification Kits (1)
    FN-1500.1480-200

    Child Identification Kits

    FN-1500.1480-200

    Programs that provide instructions and materials which help parents assemble information about their children that can be used to identify them should they run away, become lost, be abducted or become victims of violent crime. The kits usually contain a current photograph of the child (taken annually), a written description of the child (e.g., full name, address, date of birth, gender, height, weight, identifying marks, glasses, braces), a set of the child's fingerprints, a lock of the child's hair, and a copy of the child's medical and dental records. The kits may also contain a blood or tissue sample for DNA analysis and/or a videotape of the child, are kept in a safe place and are turned over to law enforcement personnel when necessary. Some programs also include abduction prevention information and instructions that parents can follow should their child become missing.
  • Child Kidnapping Alert Programs (1)
    FN-1500.1510

    Child Kidnapping Alert Programs

    FN-1500.1510

    Programs that use the resources of law enforcement and the media to alert the public when it is believed that a child has been kidnapped and is threatened with serious bodily harm or death. A description of the child, the kidnapper, involved vehicles and accomplices is broadcast in hopes that members of the public will spot the kidnapper and/or child and report their whereabouts to the authorities enabling them to rescue the child. Also included are programs that enable cell phone users to register and receive kidnapping alerts via their wireless phone.
  • Child Kidnapping Prevention (1)
    FN-1500.1530

    Child Kidnapping Prevention

    FN-1500.1530

    Programs that attempt to reduce the incidence of child abduction through a variety of educational interventions which may focus on children of various ages, parents, people who work with families and/or the community at large. Delivery formats may include fact sheets, safety tip lists and other informational materials; individual or group educational sessions; and general media campaigns.
  • Child Passenger Safety Education (6)
    JR-8200.8500-150

    Child Passenger Safety Education

    JR-8200.8500-150

    Programs that are designed to increase public awareness of the measures that people can take to protect children from preventable injuries and fatalities sustained in and around automobiles. Included are programs that provide information about laws which relate to the use of child passenger safety seats to restrain infants and young children who are riding as passengers in motor vehicles, which stress the importance of child passenger safety measures and/or which make available information about the relative merits of different types of child passenger safety seats; and those that address safety issues such as heat stroke, hypothermia, carbon monoxide poisoning, runaway vehicles, carjacking/abduction, trunk entrapment, self-release from car seat and other problems that may occur when young children are left unattended in a vehicle.
  • Child Passenger Safety Seats (3)
    JR-8400.1500

    Child Passenger Safety Seats

    JR-8400.1500

    Programs that pay for, provide and/or install car seats that can be used to restrain infants or young children who are riding as passengers in motor vehicles. Also included are programs that provide booster seats for older children or provide referrals to organizations that provide the seats or the safety checks.
  • Child Sexual Abuse Counseling (4)
    RP-1400.8000-020.18

    Child Sexual Abuse Counseling

    RP-1400.8000-020.18

    Programs that specialize in the treatment of children and youth who are coping with the trauma of child sexual abuse which occurs when an adult, older adolescent or another child threatens, forces or manipulates a child into sexual activity abusing the relationship of power and authority that adults have over children. Sexual abuse includes sexual kissing, touching, fondling a child’s genitals, oral, anal or vaginal intercourse and incest (sexual intercourse between an adult family member and a child or between siblings) as well as behaviors that don’t involve contact such as genital exposure ("flashing"), intentionally engaging in sexual activity in front of a child, verbal pressure for sex, and sexual exploitation for purposes of prostitution or pornography. Child sexual abuse can take place within the family by a parent, step-parent, sibling or other relative; or outside the home by a friend, neighbor, child care provider, teacher or stranger. Separate counseling sessions may be structured for young children who have been victimized and for older children in their teens.
  • Child Sexual Exploitation Reporting (2)
    FN-1700.1300

    Child Sexual Exploitation Reporting

    FN-1700.1300

    Programs that provide a hotline or other mechanisms that the public can use to report instances in which an individual or group of individuals is involved in the possession, manufacture and/or distribution of child pornography; online enticement of children for sexual acts; child prostitution; child sex tourism; non-familial child sexual molestation; sending unsolicited obscene material to a child or other acts that constitute child sexual exploitation.
  • Child Support Assistance/Enforcement (16)
    FT-3000.1600

    Child Support Assistance/Enforcement

    FT-3000.1600

    Programs that provide assistance which helps to ensure that parents fulfill their mutual obligation to financially support and provide health care for their children. Included are services for people who want to locate an absent parent; establish paternity; establish a child support order; request that the non-custodial parent provide health insurance for a child in conjunction with a child support order; change the amount of a child support award; dispute a child support award; or enforce payment of child support monies in cases where the supporting parent is delinquent in paying or refuses to pay or make health insurance arrangements altogether. Child support is money paid by one parent to another for the maintenance, including the education, of their children following the dissolution of their marriage or other relationship. Non-custodial parents enrolled in an insurance plan at work may be required to include the child under this coverage while those not covered by any insurance plan may be required to obtain medical coverage, if available at a reasonable cost. Child support assistance/enforcement may be provided by private attorneys, legal clinics, family law facilitators' offices or child support enforcement programs which are available in all states, often as a component of the district attorney's office.
  • Child Support Wage Assignment Assistance (4)
    FT-9200.1500

    Child Support Wage Assignment Assistance

    FT-9200.1500

    Programs that provide legal assistance for people who want to petition the court to transfer the right to collect wages earned by their ex-spouses to themselves in cases where the ex-spouse is under court order to pay child support and fails to pay as required. Under this arrangement, the amount of the child support check is taken from the delinquent parent's paycheck and sent directly to the parent who has custody of the child.
  • Childhood Immunizations (97)
    LT-3400.1500

    Childhood Immunizations

    LT-3400.1500

    Programs that inoculate infants and young children to prevent them from contracting diseases to which they are particularly susceptible including diphtheria, tetanus (lockjaw), measles, chicken pox (varicella), rubella (German measles), whooping cough (pertussis), Hib (haemophilus influenzae type B), hepatitis B, pneumococcal infections and polio. Hepatitis A vaccine is recommended for use in selected locales and for certain high-risk groups. Influenza vaccine is recommended annually for children older than six months with specific risk factors. Rotovirus vaccination (to prevent acute gastroenteritis with vomiting and severe diarrhea) is recommended during the first year of infancy. A baby should receive two or three doses depending on the brand used. Some of the childhood immunizations involve a series of doses at specific intervals.
  • Children's In Home Respite Care (4)
    PH-7000.3300-140

    Children's In Home Respite Care

    PH-7000.3300-140

    Programs that provide a brief period of rest or relief for parents, grandparents, guardians, family members or others who are regular caregivers for dependent children by offering temporary or intermittent care for the child in their own home.
  • Children's Out of Home Respite Care (5)
    PH-7000.6000-160

    Children's Out of Home Respite Care

    PH-7000.6000-160

    Programs that provide a brief period of rest or relief for parents, grandparents, guardians, family members who are regular caregivers for dependent children by offering temporary or intermittent care for the child in a community setting/facility.
  • Children's Protective Services (7)
    PH-6500.1500

    Children's Protective Services

    PH-6500.1500

    Programs that investigate reports of child abuse, neglect or abandonment; document substantiated cases; provide for the temporary placement of children who, for their own protection, have been removed from the custody of the adults who are responsible for their care; work with families who are experiencing a problem with child abuse with the objective of facilitating continued family unification or reunification; and provide ongoing supportive services for children in permanent placement.
  • Children's Psychiatric Inpatient Units (7)
    RM-3300.6600-150

    Children's Psychiatric Inpatient Units

    RM-3300.6600-150

    Programs offered in special units of general acute care hospitals that provide diagnostic and treatment services for children from infancy through age 12 who have acute psychiatric disorders, require hospitalization for maximum benefit, and who may be a threat to themselves, to their families or to others if left in the community or placed in a less restrictive treatment setting. Services may include a comprehensive evaluation; 24-hour care in a supportive, therapeutic environment; counseling for the patient and family; adjunctive therapies as needed; medication, if required; and an aftercare program following discharge.
  • Children's/Adolescent Psychiatric Hospitals (2)
    RM-3300.6500-150

    Children's/Adolescent Psychiatric Hospitals

    RM-3300.6500-150

    Institutions whose primary function is to provide diagnostic and long or short-term treatment services for children and adolescents from infancy through age 17 who have acute psychiatric disorders, require hospitalization for maximum benefit, and who may be a threat to themselves, to their families or to others if left in the community or placed in a less restrictive treatment setting. Services may include a comprehensive evaluation; 24-hour care in a supportive, therapeutic environment; counseling for the patient and family; adjunctive therapies, as needed; medication, if required; and an aftercare program following discharge.
  • Children's/Adolescent Residential Treatment Facilities (7)
    RM-7000.1500

    Children's/Adolescent Residential Treatment Facilities

    RM-7000.1500

    Programs that provide a therapeutic living environment in a community-based facility for emotionally disturbed, severely learning disabled, delinquent, pre-delinquent and/or abused children and youth who, because of the severity of their problems, are unable to adjust to other placements but do not require inpatient psychiatric hospitalization. Services include crisis stabilization, initial and continuing bio-psychosocial assessment, care management, medication management, therapy and mobilization of family support and community resources in the context of a comprehensive multidisciplinary treatment plan. Residents often attend on-grounds schools or public special education classes and receive services that are geared to their individual needs and the goal of returning to their own or their foster families.
  • Community Adult Schools (10)
    HD-6000.1400

    Community Adult Schools

    HD-6000.1400

    Public postsecondary educational institutions administered by local districts that provide learning opportunities for adults who want to learn new skills, prepare for a new career or advancement in their present job, earn an eighth grade or high school diploma, improve personal skills in English or another language, become a more knowledgeable consumer, or prepare to assume a more effective role as a participating member of the community.
  • Community Based Preschools (8)
    HD-1800.6500-150

    Community Based Preschools

    HD-1800.6500-150

    Privately operated, for-profit or nonprofit preschool programs based in community settings that have no specialized curriculum and are accessible to all children in the community. Activities generally include shape, color and number recognition; outdoor play; observation of nature and pets; fine and gross motor activities; pre-reading and pre-writing skills development; and opportunities for socialization. Community based preschools may offer half-day sessions (or less) that may be available to different groups of children on specific days of the week.
  • Conflict Resolution Training (5)
    PH-6200.1550

    Conflict Resolution Training

    PH-6200.1550

    Programs that provide training for school children and others which teaches them techniques for resolving disagreements before they escalate to violence.
  • Continuation High Schools (3)
    HH-1600.1500

    Continuation High Schools

    HH-1600.1500

    Secondary level programs that enable youth who have dropped out or been expelled from school to complete their formal education.
  • Contraception (87)
    LJ-2000.1000-150

    Contraception

    LJ-2000.1000-150

    Programs that prescribe and/or supply temporary devices for preventing pregnancy which may include oral contraceptives (birth control pills), hormonal injections (Depo-Provera), intrauterine devices (IUDs), the patch, the sponge, cervical caps, condoms, foam, the vaginal ring and diaphragms.
  • Co-Parenting Workshops (9)
    PH-6100.1550

    Co-Parenting Workshops

    PH-6100.1550

    Programs that are specially designed for parents who are separated, in the process of divorcing or have divorced or who never married but have children and who need to develop the knowledge and skills to understand and respond to the special needs their children may have as a result of the divorce/separation and to succeed in their ongoing roles as mother and father despite the fact that they are no longer husband and wife or partners. Topics may include the impact of separation and divorce on families, developmental stages of children and expected reactions to divorce, skills parents can use to minimize stress and help children to cope, guidelines for reducing conflicts and solving custody issues out of court and recognizing when a child needs special help and where to find resources. Co-parenting workshops may also be structured for parents in other situations.
  • Court Ordered Parenting Programs (10)
    PH-6100.1600

    Court Ordered Parenting Programs

    PH-6100.1600

    Programs approved by the court that provide classes which utilize a specialized curriculum that assists families with family preservation and unification. The programs target families in which children are deemed at risk for abuse and neglect and enable parents to fulfill the requirements of court-ordered family preservation contracts.
  • Crisis Nurseries/Child Care (1)
    BH-1800.1500-050

    Crisis Nurseries/Child Care

    BH-1800.1500-050

    Programs that provide temporary shelter/residential care for infants and children who are at risk for or who have experienced child abuse or neglect in the home or whose families are experiencing an emergency that makes it untenable for the child to remain in the home. Care is generally provided by licensed family child care homes that are available on a 24-hour basis when needed. Some providers are able to accommodate children to age 12 or 14 and will consider older children on a case-by-case basis, while others limit their services to very young children, generally from birth to age five or six.
  • Delivery/Childbirth (5)
    LJ-5000.1700

    Delivery/Childbirth

    LJ-5000.1700

    Programs that provide facilities and/or necessary medical attention for women who are ready to give birth.
  • Dependency Investigation (18)
    PH-6500.1500-160

    Dependency Investigation

    PH-6500.1500-160

    Programs that investigate the backgrounds of children and families who have been reported for child abuse or neglect and make recommendations to the appropriate court regarding the need for protection by the court and options for placement if required.
  • Dog Obedience Classes (2)
    PD-6250.0750-180

    Dog Obedience Classes

    PD-6250.0750-180

    Programs that provide classes for people who want to develop a basic understanding and control of their pets which usually focus on teaching dogs to obey verbal and leash commands, and which may include techniques for dealing with dogs who have behavior problems such as jumping on people, digging, barking, and chewing. Included are puppy classes and classes for older dogs.
  • Domestic Violence Issues (14)
    YZ-1750

    Domestic Violence Issues

    YZ-1750

    Programs that provide information and/or services that deal with the topic of domestic violence, i.e., spouse/partner abuse.
  • Domestic Violence Support Groups (10)
    PN-8100.0200-180

    Domestic Violence Support Groups

    PN-8100.0200-180

    Mutual support groups whose members are individuals who have been involved in physical or emotional abuse involving a spouse or other partner. The groups meet in-person, by telephone or via the Internet; provide emotional support, information and resources for those who participate; and may be structured for victims of domestic violence or those responsible for battering them.
  • Dropout Prevention (4)
    HH-1600.1600

    Dropout Prevention

    HH-1600.1600

    Programs that develop educational strategies and practices, including special instructional methods and materials, learning activities and diagnostic and assessment procedures which encourage children and adolescents to maintain an acceptable grade point average, avoid excessive absenteeism or disruptive behaviors which put them at risk for suspension or expulsion and remain in school through completion their elementary and secondary education. Included are school-based dropout prevention and academic intervention programs which lead to improved performance in the areas of academic achievement, attendance, and discipline; and community based programs, often staffed by representatives from a variety of organizations including the school, the police, the probation department, family counseling agencies and delinquency diversion agencies, which monitor and/or investigate a young person's school attendance and jointly develop and implement interventions which encourage the young person to remain in school or to return to school if already a dropout.
  • Early Childhood Education (90)
    HD-1800

    Early Childhood Education

    HD-1800

    Programs that provide educational activities and experiences for children from birth to age five which are intended to foster social, physical, emotional and intellectual growth and prepare them for further formal learning.
  • Early Head Start (11)
    HD-1800.1800

    Early Head Start

    HD-1800.1800

    A federally-funded child development and family support program that provides early education, health, mental health, nutrition and social services for low-income pregnant women and families with children from birth to age three. Services provided directly or through referral may include prenatal education and parenting classes for pregnant women; child development information; parent/child activities; a home visiting program for families with newborns; early education services in a variety of settings; comprehensive health and mental health services including smoking cessation and substance abuse treatment; coordination with organizations providing early intervention for infants and toddlers with disabilities; assistance in obtaining income support, housing or emergency cash; and transportation to program services.
  • Early Identification Programs (1)
    HH-8000.1500

    Early Identification Programs

    HH-8000.1500

    Programs that develop and implement organized plans for locating and identifying children who may be experiencing developmental delays or be in need of special education, and connect them with programs that provide evaluation and assessment services and/or school systems that offer the educational assistance they need.
  • Early Intervention for Children With Disabilities/Delays (16)
    LR-1700

    Early Intervention for Children With Disabilities/Delays

    LR-1700

    Programs that identify infants, toddlers and in some cases, preschoolers who show evidence of or are at risk for lags in physical development, cognitive development, language and speech development, psychosocial development or self-help skills, and provide or coordinate the delivery of an enrichment program in order to minimize the potential for a developmental delay and to meet their current developmental needs. The program may include early identification activities (child find); a developmental evaluation; a review of family concerns, priorities and resources; meetings with the family to develop an individualized family service plan; service coordination to ensure that the individual and his or her family receive needed services which may include but are not limited to physical therapy, occupational therapy, audiology, health/medical services, nursing services, nutrition services, psychological services including specialized play groups or therapy sessions, counseling, speech and language assistance, special instructional services, transportation, and parenting skills development; and ongoing evaluation of the child's progress and his or her changing enrichment needs. Included are "birth to three" programs and federal, state or local programs that address the needs of slightly older children or children not otherwise eligible for "birth to three" programs.
  • Early Pregnancy Classes (22)
    LJ-5000.1500-180

    Early Pregnancy Classes

    LJ-5000.1500-180

    Programs that offer classes for the expectant woman and her partner, generally during the first six months of pregnancy, which focus on anatomy and physiology, fetal development, emotional adjustments, discomforts of pregnancy and means of relief, nutrition, the effects of smoking and drinking on fetal development and options for childbirth preparation.
  • Expectant/New Parent Assistance (7)
    PH-6100.1800

    Expectant/New Parent Assistance

    PH-6100.1800

    Programs that provide educational and supportive services for new parents or parents who are expecting a child to prepare them on an emotional and practical level for the impact that a newborn will have upon their lives and relationships. Included are practical information about the care of a new infant such as bathing techniques, diapering, feeding cycles and infant and childhood illnesses and later, walking, talking, toilet training and other developmental skills; suggestions for sibling preparation; and other techniques for facilitating the addition of the newborn to the family and supporting his or her development as a toddler and young child.
  • Extended Child Care (44)
    PH-1250.1800

    Extended Child Care

    PH-1250.1800

    Child care centers, family child care homes, schools and recreation centers that provide supervised care for school-age children prior to the beginning and/or following the end of the school day, on school holidays and teacher work/conference days, during school breaks and, in some cases, during the summer when school is not in session in situation where their parents are working or otherwise engaged. While some extended day care programs provide a variety of activities for children in the program, they are not designed to provide specialty instruction such as art or music lessons, or organized sports.
  • Family and Community Medicine (61)
    LV-2600

    Family and Community Medicine

    LV-2600

    Programs that are staffed by specialists in the field of medicine that is concerned with the total health of the individual within the home environment and in the community. Practitioners of family and community medicine provide comprehensive medical care including preventive services with particular emphasis on the family unit, in which the physician's continuing responsibility for health care is not limited by the patient's age or gender, nor by a particular organ system or disease entity.
  • Family Based Services (4)
    PH-2360

    Family Based Services

    PH-2360

    Programs that provide a wide variety of social services that are designed to support healthy family development, improve the family's ability to resolve problems (such as poverty, unemployment, ill health, homelessness, substandard housing, educational difficulties, substance abuse, adolescent pregnancy, delinquency and physical and developmental problems) and prevent the need for unnecessary placement of children in foster care, group homes, inpatient substance abuse or mental health treatment programs, residential training schools or other alternative environments when family problems reach crisis proportions. Services may include home visiting services that focus on public health issues (especially prenatal), mental health and substance abuse counseling, home management instruction, success in a child care setting, parenting skills development, stress management, tutoring, pregnancy awareness and AIDS awareness; may be available to the community at large, to families at risk for dissolution or those currently in crisis; and may be offered by a single agency or a coalition of agencies that have agreed to provide services according to a coordinated case plan.
  • Family Child Care Homes (2)
    PH-1250.2000

    Family Child Care Homes

    PH-1250.2000

    Programs that provide supervised care for children in licensed private family homes during some portion of a 24-hour day. The number of children is restricted according to state regulations and is also sensitive to the age ranges of the children (e.g., a private home may be able to look after five preschool children but not five infants). Family day care homes above a certain size may also be required to employ a qualified aide and meet safety regulations such as fire inspections.
  • Family Counseling (74)
    RF-2000

    Family Counseling

    RF-2000

    Programs that offer therapeutic sessions that focus on the system of relationships and communication patterns among family members and which attempt to modify those relationships and patterns to achieve greater harmony. The therapist focuses on the family as a unit rather than concentrating on one of the members who is singled out as the person in need of treatment.
  • Family Counseling Agencies (3)
    RM-6500.2000

    Family Counseling Agencies

    RM-6500.2000

    Outpatient facilities that offer a variety of counseling services for individuals, couples, families and extended family groups who may be experiencing difficulty resolving personal or interpersonal conflicts or making personal adjustments to stressful life situations such as separation, divorce, widowhood, loss of a child, poor health, unemployment, family violence, delinquency or substance abuse.
  • Family Law (9)
    FT-3000

    Family Law

    FT-3000

    Programs that provide assistance for people who are involved in disputes or legal actions which affect their domestic relationships.
  • Family Law Courts (12)
    FC-8200.8100-200

    Family Law Courts

    FC-8200.8100-200

    State courts that handle domestic relations cases including dissolution of marriages, nullification of marriages, legal separations, paternity actions, child custody, child support, visitation arrangements, spousal support and restraining orders; and which offer marriage and family counseling to help couples to reconcile or, if reconciliation is impossible, to reach an amicable agreement on a custody plan.
  • Family Life Education (1)
    PH-6200.2000

    Family Life Education

    PH-6200.2000

    Programs that offer educational workshops that cover a range of family-living issues and help participants develop the knowledge and skills they will need to better handle life transitions and crises, improve overall self-esteem, promote growth, strengthen coping mechanisms and avert situations that can lead to family dysfunction. Topics may include parenting and step parenting skills, human growth and development over a life span, the physiological and psychological aspects of human sexuality, communication skills, couple and family relations, stress management, intergenerational issues, elder care, family and community relations, family and work relations, the impact of money and time management on daily family life, personal development, self-discovery and self-motivation. Family life education programs are offered by a wide variety of organizations including social and community service agencies, hospitals, schools and after-school programs, employee assistance programs or wellness programs in business organizations, learning centers and religious institutions.
  • Family Literacy Programs (12)
    HH-4500.2000

    Family Literacy Programs

    HH-4500.2000

    Programs offered by libraries, local literacy councils and other organizations that provide reading, writing and mathematics instruction which targets both parents and children. Included are Even Start programs, federally-funded intergenerational literacy programs for low-income families with children age eight or younger which integrate early childhood education, adult basic education/literacy programs, ESL, GED, and parenting education with the objective of breaking the cycle of poverty and illiteracy and providing both adults and children with essential life skills. The programs build on existing resources; focus on family/parent literacy, parenting skills and child development; and combine the efforts of a variety of local organizations including Head Start programs, libraries, literacy councils, local educational agencies, institutions of higher education and other public and nonprofit entities. Support services may include transportation, child care, nutrition assistance, meals, health care and referrals for employment services, mental health services, substance abuse and other identified needs.
  • Family Maintenance/Reunification (8)
    PH-6500.1500-200

    Family Maintenance/Reunification

    PH-6500.1500-200

    Programs that work with families who have an open child abuse case following emergency response or with families who have been identified as being at risk for child abuse or neglect with the objective of establishing a case plan for ongoing services which will allow the child to remain in the home or return to the home if previously removed. Services provided or coordinated for the family may include individual, group, family or conjoint counseling for the abusing and nonabusing parent(s), siblings, and/or the abused child; home management training; parenting skills training; shelter care; and/or respite care.
  • Family Planning (9)
    LJ-2000

    Family Planning

    LJ-2000

    Programs that provide assistance for people who want to control the size of their families and the spacing of their children, usually through some form of birth control; who want to explore options for conceiving; who have a problem with infertility; or who have questions about the advisability of becoming pregnant or following through with a current pregnancy.
  • Family Preservation Programs (6)
    PH-2360.2350

    Family Preservation Programs

    PH-2360.2350

    Programs that provide a variety of short-term, intensive, home-based intervention services for families experiencing a crisis that is so severe that children are at imminent risk for placement outside the family setting. Services, which are aimed at ameliorating the underlying causes of family dysfunction, are generally time-limited, of fairly short duration and available on a 24-hour basis. Also included are other family preservation program models whose programs vary in terms of the population served, the level of intensity of services provided and the length of services. The objective of family preservation programs is to preserve the family as a unit and prevent unnecessary placement of the children in foster care, a group home, an inpatient substance abuse or mental health treatment program, a residential training school or other alternative living arrangement.
  • Family Psychoeducation (5)
    RR-5150.2000

    Family Psychoeducation

    RR-5150.2000

    Programs that provide information for psychiatric patients and their families about the individual's diagnosis; the meaning of specific symptoms; what is known about the causes, effects and implications of the problem; treatment and/or management options; and how to recognize signs of relapse so they can seek necessary assistance before their difficulty worsens or occurs again. People work towards recovery by developing better skills for overcoming everyday problems and illness-related issues, developing social support and improving communication with treatment providers. Family psychoeducation includes teaching coping strategies and problem-solving skills to families, friends and/or caregivers to help them deal more effectively with the individual. It improves the knowledge patients and their families have; provides a greater understanding of the importance and benefits of medication; and reduces distress, confusion and anxiety within the family which may, in turn, help the individual's recovery. It is not considered therapy or treatment but rather is designed to stand alone or complement psychotherapy.
  • Family Support Centers/Outreach (24)
    PH-2360.2400

    Family Support Centers/Outreach

    PH-2360.2400

    Programs that provide a wide variety of social services that are designed to support the healthy development of families, improve family interaction skills and help fragile families to resolve their problems at a pre-crisis stage before they become unmanageable. Services may be center-based or provided on an outreach basis to families who are initially reluctant to seek support and generally target the specific needs of a particular community. Included may be self-sufficiency programs which help families break the cycle of poverty by addressing the barriers to self-sufficiency; early child development and school success programs; programs which address the needs of teen parents; programs which target parents at risk for becoming abusive; programs for families with children who have special developmental needs and programs that focus on the maternal and child health care needs of first-time, expectant women whose babies are at high risk for low birth weight and infant mortality.
  • Family Violence Prevention (7)
    FN-1500.1900

    Family Violence Prevention

    FN-1500.1900

    Programs that attempt to reduce the incidence of child abuse, elder abuse and spouse abuse in family settings through a variety of educational interventions which may focus on children of various ages, parents, people who work with families and/or the community at large.
  • Food Donation Programs (1)
    TI-1800.2000

    Food Donation Programs

    TI-1800.2000

    Programs that accept canned food and other food resources and keep the food for use in their own programs or donate it to food banks, food pantries, meal programs and other community-based food programs for distribution to the people they serve.
  • Food Safety Education (2)
    JR-8200.2350

    Food Safety Education

    JR-8200.2350

    Programs that are designed to increase public awareness of the measures people can take when they shop for, store, prepare, cook, defrost or reheat food to reduce the risk of foodborne illness. Topics may include proper storage and cooking temperatures, avoidance of cross-contamination, the importance of hand washing and disinfecting kitchen surfaces, safe thawing practices, prompt refrigeration of leftovers, condiment safety, animal drugs and feeds, food irradiation, bioengineered fruit and produce, dietary supplements, food allergies, food colors and additives, fat and sugar substitutes, pesticides and other contaminants, food concerns during pregnancy and tips regarding specific foods with known risk factors. Food safety education programs may target school children; consumers; or food service workers, managers, cooks, bartenders, servers and dishwashers in restaurants, hotels, schools, child care centers, long-term care facilities and other establishments that prepare and serve food.
  • Food Vouchers (1)
    BD-1800.2250

    Food Vouchers

    BD-1800.2250

    Programs that supply food coupons which can be exchanged in designated grocery stores, supermarkets and/or farmers markets for food products. The vouchers are generally provided to low income individuals and families on an occasional or ongoing basis, but may also be available to other specified populations; and may be issued in paper or electronic formats.
  • Formula/Baby Food (55)
    BD-1800.8200-250

    Formula/Baby Food

    BD-1800.8200-250

    Programs that supply infant formula and/or baby food, usually in addition to other groceries.
  • Foster Home Placement (10)
    PH-2400.1900

    Foster Home Placement

    PH-2400.1900

    Programs that link individuals who are in need of alternative living arrangements with appropriate private family homes that are licensed to provide foster care. Licensing requirements vary from state to state and, in some situations, licensing is not required at all. Programs that provide placement services for children and adults with disabilities are generally also responsible for recruiting, training, certifying and monitoring placements in family homes and for providing support for the family and the individual(s) with disabilities who live with them.
  • Foster Homes for Children With Disabilities (5)
    PH-6300.1900

    Foster Homes for Children With Disabilities

    PH-6300.1900

    Agency-supervised private family homes that provide alternative family living arrangements for children with developmental disabilities, sensory impairments, physical disabilities or multiple disabilities who are unable to live with their birth parents. The arrangement provides an opportunity for the child with a disability to live with a family in a residential setting.
  • Foster Homes for Dependent Children (7)
    PH-6300.2000

    Foster Homes for Dependent Children

    PH-6300.2000

    Programs that provide alternative family living arrangements in agency-supervised private family homes for children and youth who have been neglected, abused or abandoned in situations where a children's protective services worker or a court has decided that they cannot live safely at home.
  • Foster Parent/Family Recruitment (4)
    PH-2400.2000

    Foster Parent/Family Recruitment

    PH-2400.2000

    Programs that identify and enlist people who are willing to provide foster care for dependent children who have been removed from their homes because of abuse, neglect or abandonment and need an alternative family living arrangement, or for children or adults with developmental disabilities, sensory impairments, physical disabilities, emotional problems or multiple disabilities who are unable to live with their birth families or in an independent setting. Programs that recruit families to provide foster care for children and adults with disabilities are generally also responsible for training, certifying and monitoring placements in family homes and for providing support for the family and the individual(s) with disabilities who live with them.
  • Free School Supplies (1)
    HL-8120.7800-200

    Free School Supplies

    HL-8120.7800-200

    Programs that provide textbooks and other essential educational supplies at no cost for students who cannot afford to purchase them.
  • Gang Programs (6)
    FN-2300

    Gang Programs

    FN-2300

    Programs offered by community and law enforcement agencies that attempt to reduce the incidence of gang violence by providing counseling, recreational activities and other preventive alternatives; and/or by establishing direct contact with gang members, mediating intergang disputes, facilitating intergang communication and mobilizing the community to support gangs in finding nonviolent ways to reconcile their differences.
  • Group Homes for Children and Youth With Disabilities (2)
    PH-6300.2400

    Group Homes for Children and Youth With Disabilities

    PH-6300.2400

    Facilities that provide an alternative living environment for children and youth with developmental disabilities, sensory impairments, physical disabilities or multiple disabilities who are in need of personal services, supervision and/or assistance essential for self-protection or sustaining the activities of daily living and who are unable to live with their own or a foster family. Residents often attend on-grounds schools or public schools and also receive services that focus on the development of self-help, self-care, socialization, prevocational and independent living skills. Group homes for children with disabilities are generally licensed by the state and may be distinguished according to the level of service residents require. Service levels depend on the self-care skills residents possess, their limitations in the areas of physical coordination and mobility, and the presence and extent of behavior problems including disruptive or self-injurious behavior.
  • Group Homes for Dependent Children (4)
    PH-6300.2500

    Group Homes for Dependent Children

    PH-6300.2500

    Facilities that provide an alternative living environment for children and youth who have been neglected, abused or abandoned or have had contact with the juvenile justice system, who are unable to live with their own family or a foster family and who would benefit from a professionally supervised, structured group environment. In some situations, particularly with older youth, a group home is the only option available. Group homes for dependent children are generally licensed by the state.
  • Head Start (30)
    HD-1800.3000

    Head Start

    HD-1800.3000

    A federally-funded child development program that provides educational experiences, medical and dental services, nutritional meals, counseling and opportunities for parental involvement to help prepare low-income children and children with disabilities age three to five to enter and succeed in school.
  • Head Start Sites (28)
    HD-1800.3000-350

    Head Start Sites

    HD-1800.3000-350

    Centers administered by the grantee and delegate agencies that are responsible for providing the Head Start program for eligible children.
  • Home Rehabilitation Grants (3)
    BH-3000.3550-350

    Home Rehabilitation Grants

    BH-3000.3550-350

    Programs that provide cash assistance for people who need to make essential repairs to their homes in order to eliminate health or safety hazards or improve their security. Most grant programs cover major repairs, system upgrades and replacements (e.g., plumbing, heating or electrical systems) but not minor repairs. Age, income, disability or other eligibility requirements may apply.
  • Home Rehabilitation Services (5)
    BH-3000.3550-390

    Home Rehabilitation Services

    BH-3000.3550-390

    Programs that provide assistance in the form of labor and supplies for people who need to make major repairs to their homes or upgrade/replace entire systems to eliminate health and safety hazards (such as gas leaks, outdated or hazardous electrical wiring and plumbing) or to improve their security e.g., by installing fences or fixing/replacing broken doors or windows. Typical services include major roofing repair and/or replacement; electrical and plumbing upgrades or repairs; septic system improvements; heating and air conditioning system repairs; flooring, tile or wall repairs; and interior and exterior painting that is part of the home rehabilitation process. Most programs do not handle minor repairs. Age, income, disability, need or other eligibility requirements may apply.
  • Homeless Family Reunification Services (2)
    PH-3100

    Homeless Family Reunification Services

    PH-3100

    Programs that help people who are homeless because they have become estranged from their families establish contact with their families. The program may also, where appropriate, help them negotiate the conditions under which they can return to their families and arrange for transportation home.
  • Homeschooling (1)
    HD-0500.3000

    Homeschooling

    HD-0500.3000

    A formal program of primary and secondary education that is provided by parents who are licensed to teach their children in the home. Licensing is not required in all jurisdictions. However, it is generally mandatory for parents to closely follow the approved study outlines and home schooled children are tested according to the guidelines prevailing within the local public school system.
  • Immunizations (68)
    LT-3400

    Immunizations

    LT-3400

    Programs that provide inoculations or other prophylactic measures to prevent susceptible individuals from contracting specific diseases for which means of control have been developed.
  • In Home Child Care (3)
    PH-1250.3200

    In Home Child Care

    PH-1250.3200

    Programs that provide care and supervision for children in the child's own home during some portion of a 24-hour day. Included are Mother's Helpers who provide assistance for stay-at-home mothers.
  • Intensive Family Reunification Services (2)
    PH-2360.3300

    Intensive Family Reunification Services

    PH-2360.3300

    Programs that identify families with children in foster placement whose prospects for successful reunification are good, provide the array of supportive services needed by the family to attempt reunification, supervise visitation in the home by the child, oversee trial placement with the family and provide whatever home-based services are required to facilitate permanent reunification. Services may include mental health and substance abuse counseling, home management instruction, parenting skills development, stress management and tutoring.
  • Juvenile Courts (7)
    FC-8200.3500

    Juvenile Courts

    FC-8200.3500

    State courts that have jurisdiction over minors who have been charged with an offense that would be considered criminal if committed by an adult, who have committed status offenses or traffic violations, or who have been neglected or physically or sexually abused.
  • Juvenile Delinquency Diversion Counseling (20)
    RP-1400.8000-370

    Juvenile Delinquency Diversion Counseling

    RP-1400.8000-370

    Programs that provide individual, conjoint, family and group counseling for people younger than age 18 who are at risk for or have committed delinquent acts and who are directed to participate in counseling for a period of time as an alternative to arrest, a hearing in a juvenile delinquency or youth court, or, in some cases, another court-ordered disposition. These programs are often provided by agencies which also offer other types of counseling for young people and their families, which coordinate with the referring agency concerning the client's responsible use of services and which involve the client's family in the counseling process as needed.
  • Juvenile Delinquency Prevention (18)
    FN-1500.3600

    Juvenile Delinquency Prevention

    FN-1500.3600

    Programs that offer a variety of activities for youth who are at risk for behavior which is likely to involve them in the juvenile justice system with the objective of assisting them to improve self-esteem, to become aware of alternative ways of dealing with feelings and leisure time, and to take responsibility for the consequences of their actions. Included may be counseling, rap and discussion groups, tutoring, companionship programs, alternative peer group experiences and supervised recreational activities.
  • Juvenile Detention Facilities (5)
    FF-1500.3500

    Juvenile Detention Facilities

    FF-1500.3500

    Facilities that provide for the detention of minors who have been arrested for violating a federal or state law or a municipal or local ordinance pending a court hearing or release; and/or which provide for the confinement, treatment, employment, training and discipline of juveniles convicted of a criminal offense and sentenced by Youth or Juvenile Court to serve a period of time in a juvenile detention facility which may include juvenile hall, juvenile probation camp or a state reformatory site.
  • Juvenile Diversion (13)
    FF-0500.1800-350

    Juvenile Diversion

    FF-0500.1800-350

    Community-based programs that provide comprehensive social services for individuals younger than age 18 who have committed a minor offense and are directed to participate in a diversion program as an alternative to arrest, prosecution or, in some cases, sentencing for the offense. Most juvenile diversion programs do an assessment of the individual's needs and provide and/or coordinate the delivery of the necessary services which may include individual, group or family counseling, substance abuse counseling, supervised recreational activities, vocational guidance, tutorial services and supplemental referrals for other needs.
  • Juvenile Firesetter Intervention Programs (2)
    FN-1500.3700

    Juvenile Firesetter Intervention Programs

    FN-1500.3700

    Organizations that offer firesetter intervention programs for children and adolescents, some as young as age two or three, who have demonstrated a fascination with fire and who may have set one or more fires accidentally or through curiosity-motivated fire play. Activities generally include an interview with the youngster and his/her parents to determine the motivation for the firesetting behavior and the severity of the problem; information regarding the appropriate and safe use of fire, child supervision techniques and responsibilities, what to do if a fire occurs and the consequences of setting fires; and a concluding tour of the local fire station. Problem firesetters with deeper problems are referred to the mental health system for counseling or, if malicious criminal intent is involved, are charged with juvenile arson and become the responsibility of the juvenile justice system. Juvenile firesetter intervention programs are often offered by local fire departments in cooperation with police agencies, schools and other community groups.
  • Juvenile Probation (10)
    FF-0500.6550-350

    Juvenile Probation

    FF-0500.6550-350

    Programs that provide formal supervision and support for young men and women who have been convicted of an offense and released into the community under the supervision of a probation officer, usually in lieu of incarceration. The individual must agree to standards of conduct specified by the court for a set amount of time, usually for one year. Violations of the agreement subject the individual to revocation of his or her liberty.
  • Library Services (3)
    TJ-4500

    Library Services

    TJ-4500

    Libraries and other facilities that offer a range of activities and services which are designed to meet the information and learning needs of patrons and to facilitate their enjoyment of library resources. Included are reference services, programs which introduce and encourage reading, services which enable people who cannot access the facility to utilize library resources and special collections which provide access to a broad spectrum of general and specialized book and nonbook material as well as reading material in alternative formats.
  • Lifelong Learning Programs (1)
    HH-0500.1600-450

    Lifelong Learning Programs

    HH-0500.1600-450

    Community-based educational programs designed for adults who commute and take courses on a semester basis. Lifelong learning classes are sponsored by Institutes for Learning in Retirement (ILRs). Most ILRs are sponsored by a college or university and offer non-credit academic programs with no attached Continuing Education Credits. A lifelong learning program is structured like a typical college program with regular semesters and often homework. While some lifelong learning programs are restricted to seniors, others are open to adults of any age.
  • Literacy Programs (1)
    HH-4500

    Literacy Programs

    HH-4500

    Programs that provide reading and writing instruction for individuals of all ages who are unable to read or write at a functional level. Some programs interpret literacy more broadly and also help people develop speaking, computation and problem solving skills with the objective of ensuring that they develop levels of proficiency they will need to become self sufficient and function well in society.
  • Maternity Clothing (4)
    BM-6500.1500-500

    Maternity Clothing

    BM-6500.1500-500

    Programs that pay for or provide clothing that women can wear during pregnancy.
  • Maternity Homes (4)
    LJ-5000.5000

    Maternity Homes

    LJ-5000.5000

    Programs that provide shelter, care and support services, which often include counseling regarding future plans and instruction in child care and development, for pregnant women who are unable to remain in their own homes.
  • Mentoring Programs (14)
    PH-1400.5000

    Mentoring Programs

    PH-1400.5000

    Programs that provide companionship, guidance and/or role models for individuals who are disadvantaged because of age, income, physical or developmental disabilities or family environment.
  • Military Family Service/Support Centers (98)
    TM-5100

    Military Family Service/Support Centers

    TM-5100

    Programs located at military installations throughout the world that handle inquiries from military personnel, retirees, reservists and their family members, do an assessment of their needs and refer them to sources of help available at the installation or in the local community. The centers may provide relocation assistance, transition assistance, family life programs (e.g., parenting, stress management), individual and family counseling, employment assistance, and financial management services as well as emergency assistance.
  • Mother and Infant Care (25)
    LJ-5000

    Mother and Infant Care

    LJ-5000

    Programs that prepare expectant mothers for childbirth and provide health care services for mothers and infants during pregnancy and following birth.
  • Neonatal Care (2)
    LJ-5000.6200

    Neonatal Care

    LJ-5000.6200

    Programs that provide medical care for infants during the first six weeks following birth to ensure good health and normal development.
  • Neonatal/Perinatal Medicine (5)
    LV-6800.5500

    Neonatal/Perinatal Medicine

    LV-6800.5500

    Programs that are staffed by specialists who provide comprehensive treatment services for newborns who are ill.
  • Parent Counseling (3)
    RP-1400.8000-650

    Parent Counseling

    RP-1400.8000-650

    Programs that provide a wide variety of therapeutic interventions for parents who are experiencing emotional difficulties or conflicts concerning their role as parents. Included are individual or group counseling for one or both parents or conjoint parent counseling which focuses on and explores the mental, emotional or social problems of the individual(s) which contribute to their parenting problems.
  • Parent to Parent Networking (1)
    PH-1400.6500-650

    Parent to Parent Networking

    PH-1400.6500-650

    Programs that link parents whose children have a specific disease, disorder, disability or other issues with other parents whose children have similar challenges for the purpose of information sharing and support. Also included are programs for parents who themselves have a disability or other problems that have an impact on their parenting ability.
  • Parent/Child Activity Groups (20)
    PS-6500

    Parent/Child Activity Groups

    PS-6500

    Programs that provide regularly scheduled opportunities for parents to participate in a wide variety of recreational activities with their youngsters as a means of developing close family relationships at a stage in the child's life when quality time with their mother or father is essential for healthy development. Separate groups are usually available for mothers and sons, mothers and daughters, fathers and sons, fathers and daughters or for the entire family.
  • Parent/Child Instruction (2)
    PL-7400.6500

    Parent/Child Instruction

    PL-7400.6500

    Programs that provide structured opportunities for parents to engage in a particular recreational activity or sport in cooperation with their infants or young children, or to participate in teaching their youngsters a particular leisure-time skill.
  • Parent/Family Involvement in Education (1)
    HL-3010.6500

    Parent/Family Involvement in Education

    HL-3010.6500

    Programs that promote parent, family and community involvement in helping children succeed in school. Using a variety of involvement models, these programs encourage parents to support their children's schooling by working directly with their children on learning activities in the home and serving as an advocate for better education in their community. Parents are encouraged to model desirable behavior (e.g., reading for pleasure), discuss school matters at home, arrange for appropriate study space, organize and monitor their children's time, check homework on a regular basis, tutor their children at home, help older students make postsecondary plans and select courses which support these plans, advocate for their children when required, attend school functions, discuss their children's progress with teachers, join the PTA, vote in school board elections, attend school board meetings and, where possible, volunteer to help with school activities, work in the classroom and/or take an active role in governance and decision making about school programs at the community, state or national level.
  • Parental Visitation Monitoring (4)
    PH-6000.6500

    Parental Visitation Monitoring

    PH-6000.6500

    Programs that provide supervised visitation for people ordered by the court to visit their minor children only in the presence of a neutral, responsible person. Also included are programs that link parents with people who are trained to act as monitors.
  • Parenting Education (100)
    PH-6100

    Parenting Education

    PH-6100

    Programs that provide classes, workshops or other educational opportunities for parents or potential parents who want to acquire the knowledge and skills to be effective in their parenting role.
  • Parenting Issues (1)
    YZ-6200

    Parenting Issues

    YZ-6200

    Programs that provide information and/or services that deal with the topic of parenting.
  • Parenting Materials (3)
    PH-6100.6700

    Parenting Materials

    PH-6100.6700

    Programs that offer any of a wide variety of resources including books, audiotapes, video cassettes and learning games that provide information, techniques and suggestions for activities which enable parents to be more effective in their parenting role.
  • Parenting Skills Classes (63)
    PH-6100.6800

    Parenting Skills Classes

    PH-6100.6800

    Programs that teach skills that enable parents to deal constructively and consistently with a broad spectrum of child rearing problems which may include sibling rivalry; school behavior and performance; poor self-esteem; shyness; drug use; sexual promiscuity; and the whole range of negative, acting-out behaviors including whining, temper tantrums, disobedience, insolence and destructiveness. Some parenting skills development programs utilize a step-by-step approach for managing specific problems and may incorporate application at home of techniques that were discussed and practiced in the classroom setting. Other programs may offer participatory family workshops which provide opportunities for parents and children to learn and practice methods for dealing with one another under the guidance of a trained facilitator. Most training programs teach the parent a particular way of talking and relating to their children that reinforces positive behaviors and communication and decreases negative behaviors while supporting the development of a relationship that is built on fairness, mutual caring and respect.
  • Parenting/Family Support Groups (4)
    PN-8100.6500

    Parenting/Family Support Groups

    PN-8100.6500

    Mutual support groups whose members are individuals who have experiences relating to adoption, birth control, family planning, pregnancy, childbirth, foster care, kinship care, marriage, parenting, separation/divorce, single parenting, step families, blended families, grandparent rights or other family situations. The groups meet in-person, by telephone or via the Internet; and provide an opportunity for participants to share their experience, strengths and hopes, understand their relationships and work through related emotions.
  • Patient/Family Housing (3)
    LH-6300.3650-600

    Patient/Family Housing

    LH-6300.3650-600

    Programs that provide temporary living quarters for people who are ill and for their families while the individual who is ill receives treatment or care. Included are programs that make it possible for family members to stay in local hotels, motels or other settings at no cost or a reduced cost, hotels and motels that provide discounts for people who are visiting an ill family member and programs that maintain special facilities for this purpose.
  • Perinatal/Postpartum Depression (10)
    YF-5000.5050-170.65

    Perinatal/Postpartum Depression

    YF-5000.5050-170.65

    A condition experienced by some women immediately before or following delivery of a child which is characterized by feelings of sadness and inadequacy, lack of feeling for the baby, overconcern for the baby, crying for no reason, inability to concentrate, changes in sleeping patterns, numbness, anger, anxiety, exaggerated highs and lows and thoughts of suicide.
  • Permanent Placement Supervision (6)
    PH-6500.1500-650

    Permanent Placement Supervision

    PH-6500.1500-650

    Programs that provide long-term supervision and ongoing services for children who are in permanent placement outside their homes.
  • Pet Boarding/Sitting Services (1)
    PD-6250.6000

    Pet Boarding/Sitting Services

    PD-6250.6000

    Programs that provide facilities for the temporary housing and care of pets when their owners are on vacation or otherwise unable to maintain them. Also included are programs that provide for the care of pets in the owner's own home on a visitation or temporary live-in basis.
  • Poison Control (1)
    LH-2700.6500

    Poison Control

    LH-2700.6500

    Programs that provide emergency information, usually on a 24-hour basis, for medical personnel or others who may need to take immediate corrective action to treat an individual who has been poisoned or to prevent such an occurrence.
  • Post Pregnancy Shelter/Transitional Housing (3)
    LJ-5000.6550

    Post Pregnancy Shelter/Transitional Housing

    LJ-5000.6550

    Programs that provide a safe, secure living environment and supportive services (which may include educational opportunities, life skills training, financial planning, parenting education and counseling) for single mothers and their infants following birth. The objective of the program is to help residents become self-sufficient and move ahead with their lives by finishing school, acquiring job skills and learning to be good parents.
  • Postadoption Counseling and Support (1)
    PH-0300.0300-650

    Postadoption Counseling and Support

    PH-0300.0300-650

    Programs that provide guidance and support following placement of a child to help the adopting family through the early period of adjustment or thereafter as needed.
  • Preconception Care (2)
    LJ-5000.6570

    Preconception Care

    LJ-5000.6570

    Programs that provide comprehensive health care services including a risk assessment, health promotion and counseling to maximize the health of women of childbearing age before they become pregnant. The objective of preconception care is to eliminate (or at least reduce the incidence of) infertility, recurrent spontaneous abortions, premature births, perinatal death, low birth weight and birth defects by identifying and reducing a woman's reproductive risks which may include HIV infection, hepatitis B, rubella, toxoplasmosis, cardiovascular disease, hypertension, diabetes, use of some types of medication, electromagnetic radiation, nutritional/weight status, lifestyle risks such as smoking, alcohol use or substance abuse and adverse genetic factors. Preconception care is particularly important for women with chronic health conditions such as diabetes or disabilities.
  • Pregnancy Counseling (48)
    LJ-2000.6500

    Pregnancy Counseling

    LJ-2000.6500

    Programs that help people who are experiencing a crisis pregnancy resolve any social or personal problems that have arisen as a result of their pregnancy or the prospect of parenthood, and help them understand their conflicting emotions, put their feelings in perspective, evaluate their options and make a decision that right is for them.
  • Pregnancy Testing (60)
    LJ-2000.6750

    Pregnancy Testing

    LJ-2000.6750

    Programs that utilize laboratory procedures to determine whether an individual is pregnant or which provide access to devices for establishing pregnancy that people can use at home.
  • Pregnancy/Childbirth Support Groups (5)
    PN-8100.6500-680

    Pregnancy/Childbirth Support Groups

    PN-8100.6500-680

    Mutual support groups whose members are pregnant women or women who have had difficulties in areas relating to family planning, pregnancy and childbirth. Included are groups for individuals who are pregnant for the first time, women who are contemplating a home birth, breastfeeding women, families making decisions relating to birth control, women who have had a cesarean birth, women who are at high risk for a problem pregnancy and parents of premature or high-risk infants. The groups meet in-person, by telephone or via the Internet; and provide an opportunity for participants to share their experience, strengths and hopes, understand their relationships and work through related emotions.
  • Premarital Counseling (1)
    RP-1400.8000-670

    Premarital Counseling

    RP-1400.8000-670

    Programs that provide information and guidance for couples who are about to marry to ensure that they understand the responsibilities they will assume and the impact that the marriage contract will have on their personal lives. Included are programs that offer counseling for couples younger than age 18 which may be required by the state as a condition for issuing a marriage license.
  • Prenatal Care (62)
    LJ-5000.6600

    Prenatal Care

    LJ-5000.6600

    Programs that provide medical care for expectant mothers from the time of conception to the onset of labor to ensure their own physical well-being and the healthy development and birth of their child. Services generally include identification of risk factors based on age, health and/or personal and family history that may affect a woman's pregnancy; diet and lifestyle advice; routine checkups to look for signs of problems associated with pregnancy (such as edema, preeclampsia, or gestational diabetes) and to assure that the pregnancy is progressing well; ultrasound and other forms of prenatal testing to monitor fetal development and check for possible birth defects; and general information about being pregnant, e.g., what is normal and what is cause for concern, remedies for morning sickness or sleeplessness, managing weight gain and other common issues.
  • Prepared Childbirth (22)
    LJ-5000.1500-650

    Prepared Childbirth

    LJ-5000.1500-650

    Programs that offer classes or other educational experiences which prepare prospective mothers and their partners for childbirth without the use of medication (analgesics, epidurals, spinal anesthetics or general anesthetics) to the extent possible by instructing them in one or a combination of breathing techniques which permit them to facilitate delivery by relaxing at the proper time with respect to their involuntary contractions. The classes also emphasize a series of exercises to strengthen the back and pelvic floor, the importance of being up and walking around during labor and the use of a supportive squat position rather than a prone position for delivery. Included are Lamaze classes which address situations in which medication may become necessary and ensure that the woman and her partner are fully informed about their medication options; Bradley classes which emphasize a high degree of involvement on the part of the woman in discussing the recommendations of her doctor and avoidance of medication at all costs; and classes that are representative of other methods. The goals of the preparation are to dispel the fear and pain that are associated with childbirth and to facilitate the delivery of a healthy child.
  • Preschools (1)
    HD-1800.6500

    Preschools

    HD-1800.6500

    Programs that provide educational experiences and activities for children who are younger than compulsory school age, supplement parental care and home play and stimulate intellectual, social, emotional and motor skills development. Activities generally include preacademic skill development such as shape, color and number recognition; active outdoor play; observation of nature and pets; dancing and rhythms; block building; playhouse activities; games; simple excursions outside the school; stories and picture books. Children are also given a nutritious snack and/or meal and a period for adequate rest, and are taught basic cleanliness and good health habits.
  • Pro-Choice Pregnancy Counseling (25)
    LJ-2000.6500-650

    Pro-Choice Pregnancy Counseling

    LJ-2000.6500-650

    Programs that help pregnant women become aware of their alternatives including abortion, evaluate their options, and reach decisions that are appropriate for their individual situations. Counseling is generally also available for significant others, upon request.
  • Pro-Life Pregnancy Counseling (30)
    LJ-2000.6500-700

    Pro-Life Pregnancy Counseling

    LJ-2000.6500-700

    Programs that encourage individuals whose plans for their pregnancies are uncertain to consider alternatives to abortion including relinquishing the children for adoption or raising the children themselves.
  • Recreational/Leisure/Arts Instruction (5)
    PL-7400

    Recreational/Leisure/Arts Instruction

    PL-7400

    Programs that provide classes or individual lessons for people who want to develop an appreciation for or competency in a particular recreational, artistic or leisure-time activity.
  • Runaway Prevention Programs (4)
    RR-5150.5000-700

    Runaway Prevention Programs

    RR-5150.5000-700

    Programs that attempt to reduce the number of children who run away from home each year through a variety of educational interventions which may focus on troubled children and youth, parents, professionals who work with children and families, law enforcement personnel and/or the community at large. The programs may provide information that will help people understand the difference between a runaway child and a missing child, the motivations of a runaway, the types of problems that increase the risk of a runaway (e.g., child abuse, divorce, alcohol or drug use, oppositional or defiant behavior, antisocial peer groups), warning signs of a potential runaway, communication tips and other steps a parent can take to prevent a child from running away, and community resource options for troubled children and youth and their families.
  • Runaway/Homeless Youth Counseling (3)
    RP-1400.8000-750

    Runaway/Homeless Youth Counseling

    RP-1400.8000-750

    Programs that provide emotional support, information and guidance for children and adolescents who have run away from home and for the entire family, if appropriate, with the objective of identifying and resolving the problems that prompted the youth to leave home and/or assisting the youth to formulate and implement a workable plan for his or her immediate future.
  • Runaway/Homeless Youth Helplines (4)
    RP-1500.1400-700

    Runaway/Homeless Youth Helplines

    RP-1500.1400-700

    Programs that provide immediate assistance for children and youth who have run away from or have been pushed out of their homes or who are acting out and at risk of abuse. Included may be steps to ensure the youth's safety, information regarding the youth's rights and alternatives, and referrals for shelter, medical care, ongoing counseling or group support and other related services. Also included are programs that maintain a message relay system which allows runaways to contact their parents or other concerned individuals and receive messages from them. Helpline staff are generally available via the telephone, email, live chat, texting and/or instant message (IM).
  • Runaway/Youth Shelters (2)
    BH-1800.1500-700

    Runaway/Youth Shelters

    BH-1800.1500-700

    Programs that provide temporary emergency shelter for children and youth who have run away from or have been pushed out of their homes or who are acting out and at risk for abuse pending return to their own families or suitable alternative placement. Such facilities usually provide in-house individual, group and family counseling and the full range of other secondary services related to runaways including referral to appropriate resources.
  • Safe Havens for Abandoned Newborns (210)
    LJ-5000.8000

    Safe Havens for Abandoned Newborns

    LJ-5000.8000

    Hospitals, health centers, police stations, fire houses and other facilities that are willing to accept, without questions, newborn babies delivered by mothers who are unwilling or unable to care for an infant and are thereby at risk for abandonment. Police reports are generally not filed and no attempt is made to contact the mother's family, even in situations where her identity is known. Infant safe haven statutes vary by jurisdiction with regard to who may leave a baby at a safe haven, the age of the baby at the time of relinquishment, the facilities that can be designated as safe havens, the responsibilities of safe haven providers, anonymity protection for parents and the consequences of relinquishment.
  • School Based Integrated Services (28)
    PH-2360.8000

    School Based Integrated Services

    PH-2360.8000

    Programs, often offered directly by schools, that develop collaborative partnerships with public and private community agencies to meet the mental health, juvenile justice, social service and academic needs of school children whose struggles with multiple problems including poor physical or mental health, inadequate nutrition, substance abuse, family dysfunction or insufficient community support are affecting their educational performance. The purpose of these programs is to develop an integrated services delivery system through which existing resources are coordinated and made available to children and youth, their parents and family members at or near the school site.
  • School Placement Services (2)
    HL-2500.7800

    School Placement Services

    HL-2500.7800

    Programs that maintain lists of elementary and secondary schools and provide assistance for prospective students who need help in selecting an educational facility that is appropriate for their individual needs and interests. Included are programs that provide lists of available schools as well as those that help parents and students evaluate their options and make a choice.
  • School System Advocacy (3)
    FT-8000

    School System Advocacy

    FT-8000

    Programs that assist families in their interactions with the school system which may include help with school registration, enrollment of children in special programs, intervention on behalf of students facing disciplinary action or expulsion and other activities which facilitate communication between families and school staff.
  • Sexually Abused Children (12)
    YX-0500.8000

    Sexually Abused Children

    YX-0500.8000

    Individuals younger than age 18 who have been sexually assaulted by a family member, acquaintance or stranger or who have been subjected to sexual exploitation in the form of child prostitution or child pornography.
  • Sibling Birth Preparation Programs (23)
    LJ-5000.1500-800

    Sibling Birth Preparation Programs

    LJ-5000.1500-800

    Programs that offer classes for children whose mothers are expecting a new baby which focus on their new role as big brother or big sister and which may prepare the youngsters, if old enough, for attending the birth of the new baby. A tour of the birthing facility is usually included.
  • Special Preschools (3)
    HD-1800.6500-870

    Special Preschools

    HD-1800.6500-870

    Programs that provide educational experiences and activities that are especially designed to meet the needs of young children who are at risk for disabilities or who have been identified as having a disability and who would benefit from a structured preschool setting which focuses on social, emotional and physical development in addition to pre-academic skills. Services generally include an assessment of the child's strengths and weaknesses and the development and implementation of an individualized plan to help the child develop confidence, self-esteem and appropriate social skills.
  • Spouse/Intimate Partner Abuse Counseling (17)
    RP-1400.8000-020.80

    Spouse/Intimate Partner Abuse Counseling

    RP-1400.8000-020.80

    Programs that provide individual, conjoint, family or group treatment for individuals who are being physically, sexually and/or emotionally abused by their partners, and/or for perpetrators. Included are programs that provide therapeutic interventions for married couples, people who have live-in mates and/or gay and lesbian couples who are experiencing problems with abuse.
  • Stepfamily/Blended Family Support Groups (1)
    PN-8100.6500-850

    Stepfamily/Blended Family Support Groups

    PN-8100.6500-850

    Mutual support groups whose members have experienced divorce and remarriage and are trying to establish a single family identity involving all former and current partners and their children. The groups provide an opportunity for participants to understand their complex relationships; work through feelings, including old resentments, related to their situation; and share information and tips for everyday living including coping with custody arrangements, facilitating cooperation, sharing the children and dealing with practical issues related to time. Meeting formats may include in-person, telephone or Internet options.
  • Student Counseling Services (1)
    HL-8120.7950

    Student Counseling Services

    HL-8120.7950

    Programs, usually within the formal education system at elementary, secondary and post-secondary levels, that provide information and guidance on an individual or group basis for students, including students with disabilities, who are experiencing personal, interpersonal or family problems such as substance abuse, loss of a family member or friend, divorce of a parent, personal and sexual relationships issues, dealing with bullies; or problems that arise as a part of school or university life such as test-taking anxiety, fear of oral examinations or participating in classroom discussions, tension or inexpressiveness in difficult interviews or procrastination in studying.
  • Student Disability Services (21)
    HL-8120.7980

    Student Disability Services

    HL-8120.7980

    Programs that provide special assistance and accommodations that support the ability of students with visual, hearing, physical, emotional, learning or other disabilities to achieve their academic goals and participate in, contribute to and benefit from the institution's programs, services and activities.
  • Student Organizations (1)
    HL-8120.8100

    Student Organizations

    HL-8120.8100

    Student activity and co-curricular programs that provide opportunities for participants to explore interests, develop abilities and utilize talents in working with other students and staff.
  • Summer School Programs (1)
    HH-8300

    Summer School Programs

    HH-8300

    A program of instruction offered during the summer by a school, college or university which enables students to accelerate their progress toward a degree or diploma or to make up credits lost through absence or failure.
  • TANF (12)
    NL-1000.8500

    TANF

    NL-1000.8500

    A state program with matching federal block grant funds administered by the county or the state under state guidelines that provides time-limited cash assistance for needy families with (or expecting) children as well as job preparation, work opportunities and access to supportive services such as child care which enable parents receiving assistance to leave the program and become self-sufficient. TANF, which ends the federal entitlement known as AFDC, creates a five-year lifetime limit on cash assistance for most adult recipients; requires that recipients be working or participating in a work-related activity within two years and cooperate with comprehensive child support enforcement efforts including paternity establishment; and contains special live at home and stay in school provisions for teenage parents. States have wide latitude in structuring their TANF programs and may obtain waivers which exempt them from specific federal requirements. Recipients may receive monthly checks or be given electronic benefit transfer (EBT) cards which allow them to access their cash benefits at automated teller machines (ATMs) or point of sale (POS) equipment that is located in grocery stores, banks and other commercial locations.
  • Teen Expectant/New Parent Assistance (8)
    PH-6100.1800-900

    Teen Expectant/New Parent Assistance

    PH-6100.1800-900

    Programs that provide classes, workshops or other educational opportunities that prepare teens who are or are about to become parents to be effective in their parenting roles.
  • Teen Family Planning Programs (34)
    LJ-2000.8500

    Teen Family Planning Programs

    LJ-2000.8500

    Programs that offer family planning services including pregnancy counseling, birth control and pregnancy testing which are especially designed to meet the needs and concerns of teenage individuals who are pregnant or are concerned about becoming pregnant or impregnating.
  • Teen Pregnancy Issues (16)
    YZ-8480

    Teen Pregnancy Issues

    YZ-8480

    Programs that provide information and/or services that deal with the topic of teen pregnancy.
  • Teen Pregnancy Prevention (10)
    LJ-8000.8500

    Teen Pregnancy Prevention

    LJ-8000.8500

    Programs that provide a variety of informational and supportive services which promote healthy teen attitudes and behaviors regarding sexuality with the objective of heightening their awareness of the consequences of sexual activity and helping teens to avoid an unwanted pregnancy. Topics may include peer pressure, parent/teen communications, male/female relationships, values clarification, self-esteem, human reproduction, birth control and sexually transmitted diseases including AIDS. The goal of many of these programs is to help young people develop the knowledge, autonomy and skills they will need to make the transition to adulthood in good sexual health.
  • Teenagers With a Drug Use Disorder (29)
    YF-8000.1800-850

    Teenagers With a Drug Use Disorder

    YF-8000.1800-850

    Children and adolescents who have or are at risk of a drug use disorder.
  • Tutoring Services (22)
    HL-8700

    Tutoring Services

    HL-8700

    Programs that provide supplemental instruction for students who are having difficulty with their coursework or who want to get more out of their regular educational program.
  • Unemployment Insurance (2)
    NS-9000

    Unemployment Insurance

    NS-9000

    Programs that provide partial income replacement for a limited period of time for eligible individuals who become unemployed.
  • Weatherization Programs (4)
    BH-3000.1800-950

    Weatherization Programs

    BH-3000.1800-950

    Programs that provide assistance in the form of labor and supplies to help people improve the energy efficiency of their homes and protect them from the elements. The program provides ceiling insulation, attic venting, double glazed windows, weather-stripping, minor housing envelope repairs, low-flow showerheads, evaporative cooler vent covers, water heater blankets, pipe wrap, duct wrap, switch and outlet gaskets, caulking, and other related energy conservation measures. Weatherization programs may have age, income, disability or other eligibility requirements.
  • Well Baby Care (71)
    LF-7000.9500

    Well Baby Care

    LF-7000.9500

    Programs that provide health screening and immunization services for infants and toddlers to ensure their physical well-being and healthy development. Preschool aged children are also eligible in some areas.
  • Wellness Programs (3)
    LH-2700.9500

    Wellness Programs

    LH-2700.9500

    Programs that offer individual and/or group sessions which assist participants to understand how their lifestyle impacts their physical and mental health and to develop personal practices that enhance their total well-being. Wellness programs are holistic and combine a variety of components which may include a general physical examination that is tailored to the individual's needs; an evaluation of the person's pattern of exercise, eating habits, sources of stress and other lifestyle elements that are potential risk factors; and the development and implementation of an individualized plan for prevention management and early intervention to optimize health and performance which may include physical fitness sessions, nutrition counseling, stress reduction techniques, biofeedback, practice in assuming responsibility for one's choices, and other specific measures for avoiding physical and mental health problems.
  • Wish Foundations (2)
    LH-6300.9500

    Wish Foundations

    LH-6300.9500

    Programs that grant wishes which will enrich the lives of people who are unable to fulfill them on their own, e.g., a visit to Disneyland, an opportunity to meet a film star or sports personality or a reunion with family members. Also included are programs that arrange trips or other experiences for individuals and groups. Most wish fulfillment programs serve children and adults who are terminally or gravely ill. Other populations may include seniors, veterans and individuals who are chronically or seriously ill, physically challenged or abused.
  • Young Adults (71)
    YB-9000

    Young Adults

    YB-9000

    Individuals who are generally between the ages of 18 and 25 depending on the ages that specific programs use for qualification.
  • Youth Agricultural Programs (3)
    PS-9800.9670

    Youth Agricultural Programs

    PS-9800.9670

    Voluntary, informal education programs that emphasize the total development of young people who are members through work on the animal, engineering, family/consumer, health, resource, plant or social science project of their choice in consultation with their parents and supervising adult volunteers. Members also participate in camping activities, leadership conferences, awards programs and community service activities.
  • Youth Courts (1)
    FC-9500

    Youth Courts

    FC-9500

    Courts which serve as an alternative to Juvenile Justice Courts for youth younger than age 16 who have committed minor delinquent and status offenses or exhibit other problem behaviors. Youth whose cases are heard in youth courts are judged, convicted or exonerated and sentenced by their peers. Variously known as teen, peer, and student courts, youth courts can be administered by and operated by a variety of agencies within a community including law enforcement agencies, juvenile probation departments, juvenile courts, private nonprofit agencies and schools.
  • Youth Development (6)
    PS-9800

    Youth Development

    PS-9800

    Programs that provide opportunities for children and youth to participate in a wide range of recreational, cultural, social and civic activities through membership in clubs, scout troops and other youth groups whose purpose is to help youngsters develop their potential and grow into healthy, educated, responsible and productive adults.
  • Youth Enrichment Programs (19)
    PS-9800.9900

    Youth Enrichment Programs

    PS-9800.9900

    Programs that offer a wide variety of activities including arts and crafts, academic programs, sports, reading clubs, workshops and other recreational, leisure, cultural, social and civic activities for school-age children and youth in out-of-school hours. The objective of youth enrichment programs is to promote healthy social interaction and help participants maximize their social, emotional, physical and academic potential.
  • Youth Issues Lines (3)
    TJ-3200.9500

    Youth Issues Lines

    TJ-3200.9500

    Programs that provide telephone information about specific youth-related topics such as alcohol and drug abuse; child abuse; sexuality; sexually transmitted diseases; AIDS; birth control, pregnancy and choices; sexual assault; weight management; relationships; dealing with feelings; family concerns; dealing with rules; and school, career and life choices. Included are programs with tapes on specific topics that youth can select and access through a central number which are then played over the telephone, those that are staffed by live operators who can answer questions directly, and those that provide youth issues information via an Internet website.
  • Youth Violence Prevention (5)
    FN-1500.9700

    Youth Violence Prevention

    FN-1500.9700

    Programs that attempt to reduce the incidence of violent acts committed by youth on the streets, in the schools or in other settings through a variety of educational interventions which may focus on children of various ages, parents, people who work with families, the schools, health care providers, law enforcement officials and/or the community at large. The program may provide information about model/promising prevention and intervention programs and crisis response strategies; descriptions of the risk factors associated with youth violence; research including statistics on violence committed by and against children and teens; outreach; and/or presentations that may be tailored for a variety of audiences.
  • Youth/Student Support Groups (2)
    PN-8100.4500-950

    Youth/Student Support Groups

    PN-8100.4500-950

    Mutual support groups whose members are young people, including students, who want an opportunity to share their issues and concerns with other youth in a safe, supportive environment. Meeting formats may include in-person, telephone or Internet options.
 
Processing...


Driving Walking/Biking Public Transit  Get Directions