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Crisis & Emergency

    Results: 57

  • Clothing Vouchers (7)
    BM-6500.1500-130

    Clothing Vouchers

    BM-6500.1500-130

    Programs that supply coupons that can be exchanged in designated thrift shops or nonprofit organizations for clothing.
  • Community Disaster Education (3)
    TH-1700.2000-150

    Community Disaster Education

    TH-1700.2000-150

    Programs, activities and materials provided by organizations like the American Red Cross and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) that educate the public and help individuals and families prepare in advance for a major disaster or large-scale emergency that disrupts the normal functioning of a community. Community disaster education provides general planning and safety information for a variety of risks including fires, floods, earthquakes, hurricanes, tornadoes, heat waves and winter storms; and delineates concrete steps that people can take to inform themselves of the disasters most likely to occur in their area, develop and practice a disaster plan, purchase emergency supplies, secure their property and be ready to work as a team with family members and neighbors when an incident occurs.
  • Community Shelters (18)
    BH-1800.8500-150

    Community Shelters

    BH-1800.8500-150

    Programs, usually sponsored by community organizations or coalitions, that provide temporary shelter for homeless people, generally in dormitory-style facilities with very little privacy. Most community shelters offer support services which may include counseling, advocacy, referrals and help with future plans; and enforce house rules including curfews and mandatory household chores. Participation in religious activities is either optional or not a part of the program. There may be differences in intake, length of stay and amenities in family oriented facilities and those that target other specific populations.
  • Congregate Meals/Nutrition Sites (63)
    BD-5000.1500

    Congregate Meals/Nutrition Sites

    BD-5000.1500

    Programs that provide hot meals on a regular basis for people who are elderly, adults with disabilities or other targeted populations who may be at risk for nutritional deficits without assistance and who can profit from an opportunity to socialize with others. Congregate meals are often combined with recreational, educational and social activities.
  • Crisis Intervention (8)
    RP-1500

    Crisis Intervention

    RP-1500

    Programs that provide immediate assistance for people who are in acute emotional distress; who are or perceive themselves to be in life-threatening situations; who are a danger to themselves or to others; or who are hysterical, frightened or otherwise unable to cope with a problem that requires immediate action. The objective of crisis intervention is to defuse the critical nature of the situation, ensure the person's safety, and return the individual to a state of equilibrium in which he or she is capable of identifying and seeking solutions to the problem.
  • Crisis Intervention Hotlines/Helplines (7)
    RP-1500.1400

    Crisis Intervention Hotlines/Helplines

    RP-1500.1400

    Programs that provide immediate access to support and advice for people who are in distress with the objective of defusing the emotional impact of the crisis, ensuring the person's safety and helping the person to take the next steps toward resolving the problem. Hotlines/helplines are generally staffed by trained volunteers who are available via the telephone, email, live chat, texting and/or instant message (IM).
  • Crisis Nurseries/Child Care (1)
    BH-1800.1500-050

    Crisis Nurseries/Child Care

    BH-1800.1500-050

    Programs that provide temporary shelter/residential care for infants and children who are at risk for or who have experienced child abuse or neglect in the home or whose families are experiencing an emergency that makes it untenable for the child to remain in the home. Care is generally provided by licensed family child care homes that are available on a 24-hour basis when needed. Some providers are able to accommodate children to age 12 or 14 and will consider older children on a case-by-case basis, while others limit their services to very young children, generally from birth to age five or six.
  • Crisis Residential Treatment (8)
    RP-1500.1500

    Crisis Residential Treatment

    RP-1500.1500

    Programs that provide a short-term residential alternative to inpatient hospitalization for adults and/or children who are experiencing a mental health crisis and require 24-hour support in a supervised environment to become stabilized, but do not exhibit medical complications that necessitate nursing care.
  • Disaster Recovery Services (1)
    TH-2900

    Disaster Recovery Services

    TH-2900

    Programs that provide longer-term assistance for people who have suffered injuries or incurred losses due to a major disaster or large-scale emergency that disrupts the normal functioning of a community with the objective of facilitating the return of the community to its pre-disaster condition and/or rebuilding the community in a way that makes it less vulnerable in the future.
  • Disaster Relief Services (7)
    TH-2600

    Disaster Relief Services

    TH-2600

    Programs that facilitate the exchange of information and/or provide short-term assistance, usually in the form of food, clothing, blankets, temporary shelter, furnishings, small appliances or temporary financial aid, for people who have suffered injuries or incurred losses due to a major disaster or large-scale emergency that disrupts the normal functioning of a community. The objective of disaster relief is to help individuals sustain their lives during the immediate aftermath of the event. NOTE: "Disaster Relief" is a category of services utilized by community human services agencies involved in disaster work. Government organizations do not recognize disaster relief as a formal part of the disaster cycle. Most of the services classified as disaster relief are considered by government to be part of disaster recovery and a few (e.g., disaster welfare inquiries) are categorized as disaster response.
  • Disaster Relief/Recovery Organizations (31)
    TH-1500.1700

    Disaster Relief/Recovery Organizations

    TH-1500.1700

    Organizations that have a formal role in coordinating the provision of disaster relief and/or recovery services following a major disaster or large-scale emergency that disrupts the normal functioning of a community. Included are coalitions of community-based organizations in a defined geographic area whose members are prepared to act in concert to respond to the emergency needs of the community during the relief and recovery phases of a disaster and non-affiliated organizations with a designated role. Some collaboratives are local VOADs (known in some places as COADs), that are organized through state-level VOAD/COAD chapters which are affiliates of the national organization, National Voluntary Organizations Active in Disaster (NVOAD), a formal coalition of national voluntary organizations with a common interest in providing disaster relief. Other coalitions are "interfaiths" which gather financial and other resources from the faith community and distribute them to people in need, generally after American Red Cross and other immediate relief organizations have completed their work. NOTE: "Disaster Relief" is a category of services utilized by community agencies involved in disaster work. Government organizations do not recognize disaster relief as a formal part of the disaster cycle. Most of the services classified as disaster relief are considered by government to be part of disaster recovery and a few (e.g., disaster welfare inquiries) are categorized as disaster response.
  • Domestic Violence Hotlines (11)
    RP-1500.1400-200

    Domestic Violence Hotlines

    RP-1500.1400-200

    Programs that provide immediate assistance for women and men who have experienced domestic abuse which may include steps to ensure the person's safety; short-term emotional support; assistance with shelter; legal information and advocacy; referrals for medical treatment; ongoing counseling and/or group support; and other related services. Hotline staff are generally available via the telephone, email, live chat, texting and/or instant message (IM).
  • Domestic Violence Shelters (7)
    BH-1800.1500-100

    Domestic Violence Shelters

    BH-1800.1500-100

    Programs that provide temporary emergency shelter for women who have experienced domestic violence/abuse, and for their children. Such facilities usually provide in-house individual, group and family counseling and the full range of secondary services related to domestic violence including referral to appropriate resources. Also included are similar facilities for battered men and those that can accommodate both men and women.
  • Domestic Violence Support Groups (10)
    PN-8100.0200-180

    Domestic Violence Support Groups

    PN-8100.0200-180

    Mutual support groups whose members are individuals who have been involved in physical or emotional abuse involving a spouse or other partner. The groups meet in-person, by telephone or via the Internet; provide emotional support, information and resources for those who participate; and may be structured for victims of domestic violence or those responsible for battering them.
  • Elder/Dependent Adult Abuse Reporting (3)
    PH-6500.0500-180

    Elder/Dependent Adult Abuse Reporting

    PH-6500.0500-180

    Programs that accept reports of elder and dependent adult abuse or neglect. Services include assessment of the initial report and referral to Adult Protective Services for formal follow-up or other community service providers as appropriate.
  • Emergency Communications (2)
    TH-2300.1400

    Emergency Communications

    TH-2300.1400

    Programs that provide services, often through one or more intermediaries, which enable two or more parties to communicate in emergency situations where normal means of communication are unavailable. Included are individuals (such as amateur radio or CB operators) and organizations (such as Amateur Radio Emergency Service) that provide alternative communications channels following a major disaster or large-scale emergency that disrupts the normal functioning of a community.
  • Emergency Food Clearinghouses (1)
    BD-1850

    Emergency Food Clearinghouses

    BD-1850

    Programs that coordinate requests for emergency food assistance by screening individuals who apply using criteria established by the food pantries or other providers, maintaining lists of individuals who have been aided, and checking new applicants against the lists before referring them to a resource that can meet their needs. Emergency food clearinghouses help to avoid duplication of service and maximize the availability of food resources while relieving the agencies of the task of handling requests directly. Also included are programs that refer people needing food to an appropriate resource, but which are not the sole source for this information.
  • Emergency Medical Care (4)
    LD

    Emergency Medical Care

    LD

    Programs that provide immediate short-term assistance for accident victims and acutely ill or injured individuals who are in pain, or whose health or lives may be in jeopardy.
  • Emergency Medical Transportation (4)
    LD-1500

    Emergency Medical Transportation

    LD-1500

    Programs that provide rapid transportation to health care facilities for accident victims and acutely ill or injured individuals who need immediate medical intervention both on the scene and en route.
  • Emergency Operations Centers (1)
    TH-1500.2500-170

    Emergency Operations Centers

    TH-1500.2500-170

    Designated sites established by city, county and/or operational area authorities to coordinate disaster response, relief and/or recovery efforts.
  • Emergency Preparedness and Response Planning (1)
    TH-1700.1950

    Emergency Preparedness and Response Planning

    TH-1700.1950

    Emergency management agencies, health departments and other entities that conduct multi-hazard planning for their communities that will enable them to mitigate, prepare for, respond to or recover from natural disasters, public health crises, terrorist incidents or other emergencies that occur within or have an impact on their area. Emergency planning addresses citizen awareness and self-sufficiency, responder capabilities, interagency cooperation in emergency operations and the roles, responsibilities and activities of public and private organizations and their staffs in all phases of the disaster.
  • Emergency Rescue (2)
    JR-1800

    Emergency Rescue

    JR-1800

    Programs that provide emergency rescue operations and/or lifesaving activities for people who are stranded, lost, accident victims or exposed to other life threatening dangers.
  • Emergency Room Care (19)
    LD-1700

    Emergency Room Care

    LD-1700

    Hospitals and other health care facilities that provide 24-hour diagnostic and treatment services for people who have acute, life-threatening injuries or severe illnesses.
  • Family Violence Prevention (6)
    FN-1500.1900

    Family Violence Prevention

    FN-1500.1900

    Programs that attempt to reduce the incidence of child abuse, elder abuse and spouse abuse in family settings through a variety of educational interventions which may focus on children of various ages, parents, people who work with families and/or the community at large.
  • Federal Emergency Management Agency Offices (2)
    TH-1500.2000

    Federal Emergency Management Agency Offices

    TH-1500.2000

    Offices of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), the central agency within the federal government that is responsible for federal efforts to reduce the loss of life through a comprehensive, all-hazards emergency management program of emergency planning, preparedness, mitigation, response and recovery. Working closely with state and local governments, FEMA funds emergency programs, offers technical guidance and training and deploys federal resources in times of disaster. FEMA's programs include response to and recovery from major natural disasters and human-caused emergencies, emergency management planning, flood-plain management, hazardous materials planning, dam safety and multihazard response planning. Other activities include off-site planning for emergencies at commercial nuclear power plants and the army's chemical stockpile sites, plans to ensure the continuity of the federal government during national security emergencies and federal response to the consequences of major terrorist incidents.
  • Fire Conditions Bulletins (1)
    TH-2100.2100

    Fire Conditions Bulletins

    TH-2100.2100

    Programs that issue bulletins to warn the public that conditions are such that the potential for a wildfire along the urban interface that threatens residential areas is higher than usual. Fire conditions bulletins are issued when weather conditions are hot, dry and windy, when there has been a lack of recent rain and when local brush is dry and overgrown.
  • Fire Prevention Information (29)
    JR-8200.2000

    Fire Prevention Information

    JR-8200.2000

    Programs that are designed to increase public awareness of the measures that people can take to protect homes, businesses and property from the threat of fire. Fire prevention programs provide information about faulty wiring and other electrical hazards, kitchen fires, smoking risks, child-related fire safety, flammable materials storage, brush clearance, fire retardant building materials and ground cover, techniques for fighting a fire until the fire agency arrives (first aid firefighting) and other similar topics. Included are programs that inspect the homes of individual citizens and give them a report which recommends ways to protect their property as well as those that deal with fire safety in a more general way.
  • Fire Services (65)
    JR-1900

    Fire Services

    JR-1900

    Programs that are responsible for preventing, investigating, controlling and extinguishing fires. Activities include fire safety education, firefighting, investigating the causes of suspicious fires, maintaining equipment and trained firefighters necessary for a quick and efficient response to fires when they occur, and enforcing fire codes which protect lives and property from fires and explosions arising from the storage, handling and use of hazardous substances, materials and devices, or from conditions hazardous to life and property in the use or occupancy of buildings or other premises.
  • Food Banks/Food Distribution Warehouses (2)
    BD-1875.2000

    Food Banks/Food Distribution Warehouses

    BD-1875.2000

    Programs that gather, sort, store and distribute to participating charitable agencies, surplus food products and edible but unmarketable food that has been acquired from growers, grocers and other sources. Also included are the supermarket chains, food manufacturers, wholesalers, restaurant suppliers, agencies that organize food drives, government departments (e.g., the USDA) and other organizations that donate food on a regular basis to food banks and/or directly to food pantries, meal programs, homeless shelters and other human service agencies with food programs.
  • Food Donation Programs (1)
    TI-1800.2000

    Food Donation Programs

    TI-1800.2000

    Programs that accept canned food and other food resources and keep the food for use in their own programs or donate it to food banks, food pantries, meal programs and other community-based food programs for distribution to the people they serve.
  • Food Gleaning Programs (3)
    BD-1875.2200

    Food Gleaning Programs

    BD-1875.2200

    Programs that obtain unharvested fruits and vegetables for use by food banks, brown bag programs and other charitable food distribution programs from farmers who have crops left over following professional harvesting (or whose fields are not profitable to reap), local gardeners, and others who have fresh crops they are unable to use. Depending on local arrangements, eligible individuals and families may be invited along with volunteers to participate in organized picking trips and obtain food for their own table at no cost.
  • Food Pantries (2)
    BD-1800.2000

    Food Pantries

    BD-1800.2000

    Programs that acquire food products through donations, canned food drives, food bank programs or direct purchase and distribute the food to people who are in emergency situations. Some pantries deliver food to people whose disabilities or illnesses make it difficult for them to leave home.
  • Food Stamps/SNAP (1)
    NL-6000.2000

    Food Stamps/SNAP

    NL-6000.2000

    A federally-funded program administered locally by the county or the state that enables low-income and indigent households to obtain an electronic benefit transfer (EBT) card similar to a bank debit card which can be used in most grocery stores to purchase food. Approved households are entitled to purchase a designated amount of food utilizing their cards based on net income and household size. Benefits are generally available in an EBT account within 30 days from the date an application was filed. Expedited food stamps are available within seven days for people who are in an emergency situation and whose income and spendable resources for that month are within specified limits.
  • Food Stamps/SNAP Applications (58)
    NL-6000.2000-220

    Food Stamps/SNAP Applications

    NL-6000.2000-220

    County or state offices that accept Food Stamp applications, determine eligibility for the Food Stamp program and allotments, and issue Food Stamp EBT cards which are presented at the grocery checkout counter when purchasing food. Certified households receive their EBT card and instructions for setting up a PIN number within 30 days of the date their application was filed. Expedited food stamps are available within seven days for people who are in an emergency situation and whose income and spendable resources for that month are within specified limits. Also included are other programs that help people prepare and file Food Stamp/SNAP applications and/or are authorized to do eligibility determinations for the program.
  • Food Vouchers (3)
    BD-1800.2250

    Food Vouchers

    BD-1800.2250

    Programs that supply food coupons which can be exchanged in designated grocery stores, supermarkets and/or farmers markets for food products. The vouchers are generally provided to low income individuals and families on an occasional or ongoing basis, but may also be available to other specified populations; and may be issued in paper or electronic formats.
  • General Crisis Intervention Hotlines (3)
    RP-1500.1400-250

    General Crisis Intervention Hotlines

    RP-1500.1400-250

    Programs that provide immediate assistance for people who are emotionally distressed with the objective of defusing the crisis, ensuring the person's safety and helping the person to take the next immediate steps toward resolving the problem. General crisis intervention hotlines are available to anyone who is experiencing a crisis rather than focusing people with particular types of problems such as domestic violence or child abuse. Hotline staff are generally available via the telephone, email, live chat, texting and/or instant message (IM).
  • Homeless Drop In Centers (5)
    BH-1800.3500

    Homeless Drop In Centers

    BH-1800.3500

    Centers where homeless people can spend time during the day or evening. Services may include counseling and/or medication monitoring on a formal or informal basis; personal hygiene supplies; facilities for showering, shaving, napping, laundering clothes, making necessary telephone calls or attending to other personal needs; and other basic supportive services. Some centers may also provide meals or facilities for cooking. Programs that focus on homeless youth may provide case management, living skills training, family reunification assistance, classes and other educational supports, pre-employment training, health education (including HIV prevention), help in obtaining valid ID and other services that help youth successfully exit street life and transition to independent living.
  • Homeless Motel Vouchers (1)
    BH-1800.8500-300

    Homeless Motel Vouchers

    BH-1800.8500-300

    Programs that provide homeless people with a temporary place to stay (usually one to three nights), generally utilizing a hotel or motel with which the referring agency has a prior agreement, but in some cases, temporary lodging selected by the individual. Also included are programs that provide vouchers for use in one or more of the community's homeless shelters.
  • In Person Crisis Intervention (61)
    RP-1500.3300

    In Person Crisis Intervention

    RP-1500.3300

    Programs that provide an opportunity for people who are emotionally distressed and/or for their significant others to meet face-to-face with someone who has been trained to assess and resolve the immediate crisis, if possible, and to link the person with appropriate resources for ongoing assistance.
  • Involuntary Psychiatric Intervention (1)
    RP-1500.3400

    Involuntary Psychiatric Intervention

    RP-1500.3400

    Programs that provide a mechanism for mobile emergency response in situations where an individual's mental or emotional condition results in behavior which constitutes an imminent danger to him or herself or to another and the person is unwilling to seek voluntary treatment. The program conducts an immediate assessment of the psychological condition and functioning of the individual and can issue an order which authorizes involuntary hospitalization for a specified period of time for the purposes of observation and treatment. A request for intervention can be made by family members, community residents and/or community agencies.
  • Juvenile Firesetter Intervention Programs (1)
    FN-1500.3700

    Juvenile Firesetter Intervention Programs

    FN-1500.3700

    Organizations that offer firesetter intervention programs for children and adolescents, some as young as age two or three, who have demonstrated a fascination with fire and who may have set one or more fires accidentally or through curiosity-motivated fire play. Activities generally include an interview with the youngster and his/her parents to determine the motivation for the firesetting behavior and the severity of the problem; information regarding the appropriate and safe use of fire, child supervision techniques and responsibilities, what to do if a fire occurs and the consequences of setting fires; and a concluding tour of the local fire station. Problem firesetters with deeper problems are referred to the mental health system for counseling or, if malicious criminal intent is involved, are charged with juvenile arson and become the responsibility of the juvenile justice system. Juvenile firesetter intervention programs are often offered by local fire departments in cooperation with police agencies, schools and other community groups.
  • Municipal Police (38)
    FL-6500

    Municipal Police

    FL-6500

    The local agency that is responsible for enforcing all laws and ordinances; preventing crime; investigating criminal activity; apprehending, arresting and detaining suspects; presenting evidence; regulating traffic; investigating traffic accidents and engaging in other activities that protect lives and property and preserve peace in the community.
  • Occasional Emergency Food Assistance (18)
    BD-1800.2000-620

    Occasional Emergency Food Assistance

    BD-1800.2000-620

    Food pantries that provide a box or bag of groceries on a one-time only or other limited basis for people who are unable to provide food for themselves or their families. Included are programs that provide enough food for an entire balanced meal or series of meals and those that provide a supplemental supply of groceries. Some programs deliver food to people whose disabilities or illnesses make it difficult for them to leave home.
  • Ongoing Emergency Food Assistance (294)
    BD-1800.2000-640

    Ongoing Emergency Food Assistance

    BD-1800.2000-640

    Programs that provide an ongoing supply of groceries, usually once a month, for people whose income is not sufficient to meet their needs. Included are programs that provide enough food for an entire balanced meal or series of meals and those that provide a supplemental supply of groceries. Some programs deliver food to people whose disabilities or illnesses make it difficult for them to leave home.
  • Personal Alarm Systems (4)
    PH-1800.6260

    Personal Alarm Systems

    PH-1800.6260

    Programs that provide electronic equipment which connects frail elderly individuals, people who have disabilities or people at risk of violence from an ex-partner with the police, participating hospitals, paramedics or other sources of emergency assistance.
  • Poison Control (1)
    LH-2700.6500

    Poison Control

    LH-2700.6500

    Programs that provide emergency information, usually on a 24-hour basis, for medical personnel or others who may need to take immediate corrective action to treat an individual who has been poisoned or to prevent such an occurrence.
  • Post Disaster Crisis Hotlines (1)
    TH-2600.6500-650

    Post Disaster Crisis Hotlines

    TH-2600.6500-650

    Programs that establish crisis intervention services via the telephone, email, live chat and/or instant message (IM) which offer short-term, disaster-oriented, emotional support and problem solving assistance for individuals and families who are attempting to deal with their fears and other negative psychological after-effects of a major disaster or large-scale emergency that disrupts the normal functioning of a community. Post-disaster crisis hotlines help disaster victims cope with their losses, establish priorities for their immediate future, identify and work with psychological roadblocks and develop the positive skills they will need to feel in control of their lives and begin to recover.
  • Post Disaster Food Services (2)
    TH-2600.6450

    Post Disaster Food Services

    TH-2600.6450

    Programs that meet the basic nutritional needs of relief workers and/or individuals and families whose homes have been made uninhabitable by a disaster or large scale emergency and who have no other means of purchasing food and/or preparing a meal. Food assistance may also available to individuals who have experienced a localized incident such as a house fire.
  • Post Pregnancy Shelter/Transitional Housing (3)
    LJ-5000.6550

    Post Pregnancy Shelter/Transitional Housing

    LJ-5000.6550

    Programs that provide a safe, secure living environment and supportive services (which may include educational opportunities, life skills training, financial planning, parenting education and counseling) for single mothers and their infants following birth. The objective of the program is to help residents become self-sufficient and move ahead with their lives by finishing school, acquiring job skills and learning to be good parents.
  • Product Safety Alerts/Recalls (1)
    JR-8000.6200

    Product Safety Alerts/Recalls

    JR-8000.6200

    Programs that issue bulletins to update the public about appliances, clothing, electronics, electrical power devices, furniture, household products, lighting/lighter products, sports/exercise equipment, toys and other consumer products that are subject to voluntary or mandatory recall or about which safety concerns have been registered. Safe handing information may be provided in situations where a product reported to be a safety hazard may still be for sale or in consumers' homes.
  • Psychiatric Emergency Room Care (1)
    RP-1500.6750

    Psychiatric Emergency Room Care

    RP-1500.6750

    Psychiatric and health care facilities that are capable of restraining and treating people who are in acute emotional distress on a 24-hour basis.
  • Runaway/Youth Shelters (2)
    BH-1800.1500-700

    Runaway/Youth Shelters

    BH-1800.1500-700

    Programs that provide temporary emergency shelter for children and youth who have run away from or have been pushed out of their homes or who are acting out and at risk for abuse pending return to their own families or suitable alternative placement. Such facilities usually provide in-house individual, group and family counseling and the full range of other secondary services related to runaways including referral to appropriate resources.
  • Sack Lunches/Dinners (7)
    BD-1800.8000

    Sack Lunches/Dinners

    BD-1800.8000

    Programs that provide lunch or dinner in a small bag for people who would not otherwise have a meal. The program may target homeless or low-income people or other specific groups.
  • Street Outreach Programs (6)
    PH-8000

    Street Outreach Programs

    PH-8000

    Programs that are staffed by outreach workers who spend time with people who live on the street, build relationships with them, identify and address their immediate needs (e.g., crisis intervention, food, clean clothing, hygiene kits, blankets, someone to listen) and provide information about and linkage to longer-term forms of support such as shelter, counseling, drug and alcohol detoxification and rehabilitation, care/case management and, where applicable, family reunification services. Street outreach programs may be staffed by volunteers or peers who were formerly homeless; and may target special populations such as homeless youth at risk for sexual abuse or exploitation, veterans, or people with specific medical or mental health conditions, or be available to the larger homeless population.
  • Suicide Prevention Programs (7)
    RR-5150.5000-800

    Suicide Prevention Programs

    RR-5150.5000-800

    Programs that attempt to reduce the incidence of suicide through a variety of educational interventions which have the objective of exploring alternatives to self-harm or self-destruction. Suicide prevention programs help people understand the nature of the problem; the risk factors and warning signs; and sources for treatment and support. Included are prevention programs that address specific target populations as well as those that are intended to reach the community at large. Delivery formats may include printed materials, videos or websites that address the subject and presentations in schools and agencies and to family groups.
  • Trauma Centers (9)
    LD-8500

    Trauma Centers

    LD-8500

    Hospitals that are strategically located and equipped with licensed helicopter pads and staffed by specially trained trauma surgeons and anesthesiologists who are available in-house 24 hours per day to treat critically injured victims of traffic accidents, fires, gunshot wounds or other injuries during the crucial "golden hour" when their surgical needs are highest.
  • Urgent Care Centers (23)
    LN-8500

    Urgent Care Centers

    LN-8500

    Programs, which may be available on a 24-hour basis, that provide walk-in treatment services for people who have minor illnesses or injuries. Urgent care centers serve as an alternative to hospital emergency departments for episodic care that can not be delayed until an appointment at a physician's office is available; and are often equipped to provide services not generally available in primary care physician offices, e.g., have x-ray facilities that allow for treatment of minor fractures and foreign bodies such as nail gun injuries and/or minor care trauma rooms that facilitate the repair of minor and moderate to severe lacerations that can be treated in an urgent care center.
 
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