• Human-Translated Fact Sheets and Video
  • Large Print

Senior Services

    Results: 60

  • Activities of Daily Living Assessment (1)
    LF-0100

    Activities of Daily Living Assessment

    LF-0100

    Programs that evaluate an individual's capacity for self-care and his or her ability to function independently in the context of everyday living and which, where necessary, may recommend rehabilitative services (e.g., independent living skills instruction), supportive services (e.g., attendant care, personal care or home health care), or an alternative residential setting (e.g., an assisted living center or nursing facility). Activities of daily living include bathing, eating, dressing, mobility, transferring from bed to chair and using the toilet. Most assessments also include instrumental activities of daily living such as using the telephone, taking medication, money management, housework, meal preparation, laundry and grocery shopping. Evaluation services are generally provided for individuals who have physical and/or mental limitations or for people whose age may constitute a temporary (children) or developing (elderly) limitation.
  • Adult Day Health Programs (4)
    PH-0320.0400

    Adult Day Health Programs

    PH-0320.0400

    Day care centers that provide health and related services as well as care and supervision for adults who require physical rehabilitation, dementia management or other condition-specific forms of assistance on a limited but regular basis and who would be at risk of entering a skilled nursing or intermediate care facility without the support of this type of center. Ancillary services usually include meals and limited social activities.
  • Adult Day Program Complaints (3)
    DD-1500.0070

    Adult Day Program Complaints

    DD-1500.0070

    Programs that accept and, where possible, attempt to resolve complaints regarding individuals and organizations that provide adult day care or adult day health care services. Included are complaints concerning licensing, cleanliness and safety of the homes or facilities, treatment of program participants, quality of care, excessive fees, unethical or improper conduct of personnel or other inappropriate business practices of adult day program providers.
  • Adult In Home Respite Care (10)
    PH-7000.3300-040

    Adult In Home Respite Care

    PH-7000.3300-040

    Programs that provide a brief period of rest or relief for family members, guardians or others who are regular caregivers for dependent adults by offering temporary or intermittent care for the adult in their own home.
  • Adult Out of Home Respite Care (8)
    PH-7000.6000-060

    Adult Out of Home Respite Care

    PH-7000.6000-060

    Programs that provide a brief period of rest or relief for family members, guardians or others who are regular caregivers for dependent adults by offering temporary or intermittent care for the adult in a community setting/facility.
  • Adult Protective Intervention/Investigation (2)
    PH-6500.0500-050

    Adult Protective Intervention/Investigation

    PH-6500.0500-050

    Programs that investigate and intervene on behalf of adults who are unable to act on their own behalf, manage their own affairs, or who are in immediate danger due to physical or emotional abuse, unsafe or hazardous living conditions, exploitation, neglect or abandonment. Services may include removal of the individual to safer surroundings, authorization for medical treatment and other available services necessary to remove the conditions which have created a threat to life. Included are programs that receive reports of and investigate elder abuse involving noninstitutionalized adults.
  • Adult Residential Care Homes (61)
    BH-8400.6000-040

    Adult Residential Care Homes

    BH-8400.6000-040

    Residential homes or facilities that offer personal care and individual attention for older adults, people with disabilities and other populations whose limitations prevent them from living alone. Adult residential care homes (which are also known as board and care homes, residential board and care homes, personal care homes or residential care facilities for the elderly) generally provide a room (which may be shared), meals and supervision; and may specialize in populations with specific needs such as people with Alzheimer's disease or those with developmental disabilities. Services vary from facility to facility but may include dietary and housekeeping services, monitoring of prescription medication, social and recreational opportunities, incontinence care and assistance with toileting, bathing, grooming, dressing, mobility and other activities of daily living. Some homes provide secured surroundings for confused elderly adults who may wander while others are unable to accept individuals who are incontinent or who have severe problems with memory loss. There is considerable variation among these homes in terms of size, resident mix, daily charges and services. Most but not all adult residential care homes or facilities are licensed by the state in which they are located.
  • Adult Residential Facility Complaints (4)
    DD-1500.0080

    Adult Residential Facility Complaints

    DD-1500.0080

    Programs, usually offered by licensing authorities, that accept and, where possible, attempt to resolve complaints regarding the licensing, cleanliness and safety of facilities, treatment of residents, quality of care, excessive fees, unethical or improper conduct of personnel or other inappropriate business practices of group residences for adults with disabilities, assisted living facilities, and senior residential care homes.
  • Adult Residential Facility Licensing (3)
    DF-4500.2000-100

    Adult Residential Facility Licensing

    DF-4500.2000-100

    Programs that establish and enforce health, safety and program standards for group residences for older adults and adults with disabilities including adult foster homes, group homes, adult residential care homes, assisted living facilities, continuing care retirement communities, semi-independent living residences for adults with disabilities and other similar facilities where licensing requirements apply; review applications for licenses; issue or deny licenses; inspect facilities for compliance with requirements; and revoke licenses or bring disciplinary action for noncompliance.
  • Alzheimer's Disease (21)
    YF-3000.0440

    Alzheimer's Disease

    YF-3000.0440

    An age-related, non-reversible brain disorder that develops over a period of years. Initially, people experience memory loss and confusion, which may be mistaken for the kinds of memory changes that are sometimes associated with normal aging. The symptoms gradually lead to behavior and personality changes, a decline in cognitive abilities such as decision-making and language skills and problems recognizing family and friends; and ultimately to a severe loss of mental function. Alzheimer's disease is one of a group of disorders called dementias that are characterized by cognitive and behavioral problems. It is the most common cause of dementia among people age 65 and older.
  • Area Agencies on Aging (2)
    TD-1100.6500-050

    Area Agencies on Aging

    TD-1100.6500-050

    Substate organizations authorized under the Older Americans Act of 1965 to develop a comprehensive, coordinated system of community-based services for older adults within their planning and service area. State Units on Aging designate, provide federal and state funding, and monitor operations of AAAs. Eight states and the District of Columbia do not have AAAs and, therefore, serve the roles of both state and area agency. AAA's responsibilities include planning; development of local funding resources; and contracting with local service provider organizations to provide authorized services which include information and referral/assistance, outreach, case/care management, escort, transportation, homemaker/chore, personal care, home repair and rehabilitation, home delivered meals, congregate meals, adult day care, elder abuse prevention, nursing home ombudsman, legal assistance, employment and training, health promotion and disease prevention and senior centers as well as services that support caregivers including respite care, counseling and education programs. AAAs may provide a number of other services in situations where local service provider options are limited.
  • Assisted Living Facilities (1)
    BH-8400.6000-060

    Assisted Living Facilities

    BH-8400.6000-060

    Residential facilities specially constructed or converted to combine housing and supportive services in a "homelike" environment with the goal of maximizing the individual functioning and autonomy of residents. Assisted living facilities generally have private apartment-style accommodations with walk in showers, wide doors for wheelchair access, emergency pull cord systems and other special amenities; and offer the individualized array of personal care services which will allow each resident to function as independently as possible. Services vary from facility to facility, but usually include three meals a day with special diets, as required; housekeeping and linen services; personal laundry; social and recreational activities; transportation to medical appointments, stores and community services; money management assistance; assistance with toileting, bathing, grooming, dressing, mobility and other activities of daily living; medication management and administration; therapy and pharmacy services; and wellness and exercise programs. Assisted living facilities may be licensed by the state or may not require a license depending on the area in which they are located.
  • Caregiver Counseling (6)
    RP-1400.8000-145

    Caregiver Counseling

    RP-1400.8000-145

    Programs that provide emotional support, information and guidance in individual and/or group settings for family members, friends, significant others, non-familial caregivers or attendants who are caring for someone who has a serious illness or disability or who is elderly and increasingly unable to provide for his or her own care, and are feeling overwhelmed by their responsibilities and the effect that their caregiving role has had on their lives.
  • Caregiver/Care Receiver Support Groups (18)
    PN-8100.1400

    Caregiver/Care Receiver Support Groups

    PN-8100.1400

    Mutual support groups whose members are family, friends, significant others, non-familial caregivers or attendants who are caring for someone who has a temporary, chronic, life-threatening or terminal illness or disability or who is elderly and increasingly unable to provide for his or her own care. The groups meet in-person, by telephone or via the Internet; and provide emotional support, information and resources to help participants ensure their own well-being while remaining involved in the intense care of a loved one. Also included are care receiver support groups that help people who have a caregiver cope with the fact that they require care. Care receiver support groups are often offered in conjunction with caregiver support groups and are structured to allow care receivers to participate in their own group while their caregiver attends another.
  • Centers for Independent Living (14)
    LR-1550

    Centers for Independent Living

    LR-1550

    Consumer controlled, community based, cross disability, nonresidential agencies designed and operated within a local community by individuals with disabilities that provide an array of independent living services. All CILs provide four core services: information and referral, independent living skills training, peer counseling, and individual and systems advocacy. In addition, many CILs also offer transportation services, mobility training, personal assistance, housing and home modifications, recreation services, vocational programs, assistance in obtaining assistive technology equipment and other individualized services designed to increase and maintain independence.
  • Companionship (2)
    PH-1400

    Companionship

    PH-1400

    Programs that provide friendship and shared activities and/or appropriate role models for individuals who suffer from lack of company, loneliness or social isolation; who need emotional support from a "buddy" to cope with a difficult life situation; who need practice conversing in English; or who lack the companionship and guidance of an adult or figure or peer role model.
  • Death and Dying Issues (3)
    YZ-1670

    Death and Dying Issues

    YZ-1670

    Programs that provide information and/or services that deal with the topic of death, the process of dying and/or the concept of death and dying as seen from different historical, philosophical, spiritual, religious, medical and mental health perspectives.
  • Dementia (16)
    YF-3000.2380

    Dementia

    YF-3000.2380

    An acquired reduction in mental capacity that is characterized by impairment of memory, judgment and intellectual functioning which is often accompanied by behavioral disturbances.
  • Dementia Evaluation (2)
    LF-4900.1650

    Dementia Evaluation

    LF-4900.1650

    Programs that offer a variety of tests to establish the presence of Alzheimer's disease, Pick's disease or other conditions which involve loss of memory, deterioration of intellectual functioning, disorientation and other similar symptoms.
  • Dementia Management (20)
    LT-1750.1700

    Dementia Management

    LT-1750.1700

    Programs that offer any of a variety of therapeutic approaches which are intended to maximize the existing cognitive functioning of people who have Alzheimer's disease, Pick's disease or other forms of cognitive impairment. Interventions include structured activities and exercises that are designed for people who have a short attention span and require extra verbal and visual stimulation with the objective of enhancing the individual's perception of the environment, promoting trust, reducing anxiety, avoiding overstimulation and maximizing communication skills.
  • Elder Abuse Counseling (3)
    RP-1400.8000-020.24

    Elder Abuse Counseling

    RP-1400.8000-020.24

    Programs that provide individual, conjoint, family or group treatment for older adults who are being physically, sexually and/or emotionally abused by members of their family, and/or for perpetrators of elder abuse. Also included are programs that provide counseling for dependent adults who are victims of abuse.
  • Elder Abuse Prevention (2)
    FN-1500.1900-180

    Elder Abuse Prevention

    FN-1500.1900-180

    Programs that attempt to reduce the incidence of financial, emotional, physical and sexual abuse or intimidation of elderly people and dependent adults by members of their families or other caregivers through a variety of educational interventions which are aimed at the likely victims of abuse, potential perpetrators, people who work with families and/or the community at large.
  • Elder Law (10)
    FT-2450

    Elder Law

    FT-2450

    Programs that provide information and guidance for individuals who need assistance in the area of law which relates to the rights and needs of older adults, especially in the areas of age discrimination, consumer fraud, estate planning and management, living trusts, trust administration, probate, property law, retirement planning, pension benefits, Social Security benefits, Medicaid and Medicare, disability planning, long-term care alternatives, health care decisions, elder abuse, guardianships and conservatorships.
  • Elder/Dependent Adult Abuse Reporting (3)
    PH-6500.0500-180

    Elder/Dependent Adult Abuse Reporting

    PH-6500.0500-180

    Programs that accept reports of elder and dependent adult abuse or neglect. Services include assessment of the initial report and referral to Adult Protective Services for formal follow-up or other community service providers as appropriate.
  • Foster Grandparent Program (1)
    ND-9200.8000-200

    Foster Grandparent Program

    ND-9200.8000-200

    Programs that provide part-time opportunities for low-income individuals age 60 and older to serve as mentors, tutors and caregivers for abused or neglected children, troubled youth, or youngsters with disabilities or other special needs in schools, hospitals, child care programs, Head Start programs and residential settings. Foster grandparents receive a modest tax-free stipend for their work as well as reimbursements for their travel expenses, and have the satisfaction of helping young people grow, gain confidence, and become more productive members of society. Local nonprofit organizations and public agencies receive grants to sponsor and operate local Foster Grandparent projects. The Foster Grandparents Program is part of Senior Corps, a network of programs administered by the Corporation for National and Community Service.
  • Geriatric Assessment (31)
    LF-4900.2050

    Geriatric Assessment

    LF-4900.2050

    Programs, generally staffed by an interdisciplinary team comprising a geriatrician, a nurse, a social worker and a pharmacist, that evaluate the functional ability, physical health, cognitive and mental health and socioenvironmental situation of older adults, particular those who are frail or chronically ill, to identify health-related problems, develop plans for treatment and follow-up, coordinate care, determine the need for long-term care, and ensure the optimal use of health care resources. Beneficial outcomes may include greater diagnostic accuracy, improved functional and mental status, reduced mortality, decreased use of nursing facilities and acute care hospitals and increased satisfaction with care.
  • Geriatric Medicine (23)
    LV-3300.2900

    Geriatric Medicine

    LV-3300.2900

    Programs that are staffed by specialists who provide comprehensive preventive, diagnostic and treatment services for elderly individuals who have diseases or conditions that are associated with the aging process. Special assistance may include recognizing altered presentations of illnesses, dealing with multisystem organ involvement, handling special drug interactions, utilizing resources such as nursing homes and community social services, and assisting with ethical issues in the care of people who are elderly.
  • Geriatric Psychiatry (2)
    RP-6400.2700

    Geriatric Psychiatry

    RP-6400.2700

    Programs that specialize in providing multidisciplinary care including preventive, diagnostic, treatment and rehabilitation services for older adults with anxiety disorders, depression, cognitive impairments, psychoses or other mental health conditions in their homes, in long term care facilities or in hospital or nursing facility settings. The objectives of geriatric psychiatry are to improve the quality of life for older individuals who may have a combination of psychological, physical and social needs; and to support their ability to live independently in the community for as long as possible.
  • Group Residences for Adults With Disabilities (6)
    BH-8400.6000-280

    Group Residences for Adults With Disabilities

    BH-8400.6000-280

    Agency-owned or operated facilities that provide an alternative living environment for adults with developmental disabilities, sensory impairments, physical disabilities, emotional disabilities, multiple disabilities or chronic illnesses such as AIDS who are in need of personal services, supervision and/or assistance essential for self-protection or sustaining the activities of daily living and consequently are unable to live with their own families or in a more independent setting. Group residences for adults with disabilities may be licensed by the state and may be distinguished according to the level of service residents require. Service levels depend on the self-care skills residents possess, their limitations in the areas of physical coordination and mobility, and the presence and extent of behavior problems including disruptive or self-injurious behavior.
  • Home Delivered Meals (33)
    BD-5000.3500

    Home Delivered Meals

    BD-5000.3500

    Programs that prepare and deliver regular meals to older adults and people with disabilities who are unable to shop and/or prepare the food for themselves or travel to a site where a meal is being served.
  • Home Health Aide Services (6)
    LT-2800.3000

    Home Health Aide Services

    LT-2800.3000

    Programs that offer the services of paraprofessional aides who provide personal health care services which do not require special technical training, in the homes of recently discharged hospital patients, elderly individuals and people with disabilities. Services are provided in accordance with a written home health care plan and may include feeding, bathing and grooming patients; changing their beds; taking their temperature, pulse or respiration; helping them to the toilet or to use a bedpan; and other types of assistance that enhance their physical and emotional comfort. The home health aide may also perform other activities as taught by a health professional for a specific patient including changing a colostomy bag; assisting with the use of devices for aid to daily living; assisting with prescribed range of motion exercises; assisting with prescribed ice cap or collar; doing simple urine tests for sugar, acetone or albumin; measuring and preparing special diets; measuring fluid intake and output; and supervising the self-administration of medications (reminding the individual to take the medication, opening bottle caps, reading the medication label to the individual, observing the individual taking medications, checking the self-administered dosage against the label of the container and reassuring the individual that they have obtained and are taking the correct dosage).
  • Home Health Care (2)
    LT-2800

    Home Health Care

    LT-2800

    Programs that make necessary medical services available in the homes of people who are aged, ill or convalescing.
  • Hospice Care (5)
    LT-3000

    Hospice Care

    LT-3000

    Programs that provide a full range of supportive services for terminally ill individuals who are in the final stages of their illnesses and for their families. Services may include medical care, pain and symptom management, home nurse visitation, case management, emotional and spiritual support, and bereavement services for the patient and members of the family. Hospice care may be provided at home, in a freestanding hospice facility, a hospice unit of a hospital or in long-term care facilities such as nursing homes. In order to qualify for Medicaid or Medicare reimbursement, an individual must have a life threatening illness and must be certified by their physician to have entered the last six months of life.
  • Hospice Facilities (4)
    LT-3000.3000

    Hospice Facilities

    LT-3000.3000

    Programs that provide a full range of supportive services in an inpatient or residential setting for terminally ill people who are in the final stages of their illnesses and for their families. Services may include medical care, pain and symptom management, home nurse visitation, case management, emotional and spiritual support, and bereavement services for the patient and members of the family.
  • In Home Supportive Services Subsidies (2)
    NL-3000.3300

    In Home Supportive Services Subsidies

    NL-3000.3300

    A program administered by the county that provides financial assistance which enables people who are aged, blind or have a disability, are limited in their ability to care for themselves and cannot live safely at home without assistance to obtain homemakers or chore workers to help them in their homes. To be eligible, recipients must meet income and resource guidelines which in some states are tied to Supplemental Security Income (SSI/SSP) eligibility. People who receive SSI/SSP automatically meet the program's financial need requirement. Those whose income is higher than the limits for SSI/SSP may still be eligible, but may be required to pay for part of the services they receive. In addition to the monthly income limits, there are also limits on the amount of resources a person can own and still receive these benefits. Resources include items such as savings, investments, and certain types of property and personal possessions. Eligibility requirements vary by state as do the types of services that can be authorized.
  • Independent Living Communities/Complexes (2)
    BH-7000.5100-330

    Independent Living Communities/Complexes

    BH-7000.5100-330

    Residential facilities, apartments and/or planned communities for older adults, people with disabilities or other populations that are available at market rates and designed to enable those who are eligible to have a form of independent living in a secure environment while sharing common interests and having access to supportive services and a range of activities designed to promote social contact among residents. Occupancy by families with children may be discouraged. Housing varies widely from simple apartments to high rise condominiums to single family detached housing to housing in a congregate setting; and units may be available on a purchase or rental basis. Support usually consists of "convenience services" which may include an on-site activities program, transportation, housekeeping and meals in a communal dining room. Residents who require additional support need to make their own arrangements for personal care, home health care or other in-home services. These facilities generally require no licensing.
  • Intergenerational Programs (2)
    PS-3300

    Intergenerational Programs

    PS-3300

    Programs that increase cooperation, interaction or exchange between people of different generations dispelling stereotypes about old and young, and enabling individuals, families and communities to enjoy and benefit from the richness of an age-integrated society. Intergenerational programs are structured so that both age groups benefit from the interaction, but in many programs, one age group is the provider of service while the other is the recipient. Older people may mentor children or adolescents and serve as role models for young people who are preparing for adulthood, while students who understand the latest technology may teach older adults computer skills in their homes, senior centers or long term care settings. Older adults gain opportunities to develop meaningful contact with younger people and stay in touch with their communities while children and youth develop healthy attitudes about aging, gain an appreciation for rich cultural traditions and histories, and experience the satisfaction of sharing something they know. In many communities, young and old are working together as partners on community projects, and are finding that the collaboration leads to mutual appreciation while their communities reap the benefits of their work.
  • Medicaid Fraud Reporting (2)
    FN-1700.9500-500

    Medicaid Fraud Reporting

    FN-1700.9500-500

    Programs that provide a hotline or other mechanisms that Medicaid recipients and the public at large can use to report recipients or health care providers that make false statements or representations which result in an unauthorized payment by the Medicaid program to themselves or another. Examples of fraud include incorrect reporting of diagnoses or procedures to maximize payments; billing for services, medical supplies or equipment not furnished; misrepresentation of the dates and descriptions of services furnished, the identity of the recipient or the individual furnishing services; and billing for noncovered or nonchargeable services as covered items.
  • Medicare (5)
    NS-8000.5000

    Medicare

    NS-8000.5000

    A federally funded health insurance program administered by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), previously known as the Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA), for people age 65 and older; for individuals with disabilities younger than age 65 who have received Social Security Disability benefits for at least 24 consecutive months; and for insured workers and their dependents who have end stage renal disease and need dialysis or a kidney transplant. Premiums, deductibles, and co-payments or out-of-pocket costs are required for Medicare coverage. Special programs that assist with paying some or all of these costs are available for low income persons who qualify. Medicare has four parts: Hospital Insurance (Part A), which helps pay for care in a hospital or skilled nursing facility, home health care and hospice care; Supplemental Medical Insurance (Part B), which helps pay for doctors, outpatient hospital care and other medical services including the Medicare Preventive benefits (effective January 1, 2005); Medicare Advantage (Part C, formerly known as Medicare+Choice), which offers a variety of Medicare managed care options, including coordinated care plans and private, unrestricted fee-for-service plans, that are required to provide, at minimum, the same benefits as Part A and B, excluding hospice services; and the Medicare Prescription Drug Benefit (Part D, effective January 1, 2006), a program managed by private plans that assists in covering the cost of prescription drugs for beneficiaries. People who have Medicare Part A and/or Part B need to join a Medicare prescription drug program to obtain insurance coverage for prescription drugs.
  • Medicare Fraud Reporting (2)
    FN-1700.3350-550

    Medicare Fraud Reporting

    FN-1700.3350-550

    Programs that provide a hotline or other mechanisms that persons with Medicare and the public at large can use to report health care providers or beneficiaries who make false statements or representations which result in an unauthorized payment by the Medicare program to themselves or another. Also included are organizations that accept and investigate reports about fraudulent entities that misrepresent themselves as approved Medicare Part D Prescription Drug Plans; approved plans that use aggressive marketing tactics, discriminate against a beneficiary (e.g., prevent them from signing up for a plan based on their age, health status, race or income), entice beneficiaries to enroll in a more costly plan than they require, or erroneously charge beneficiaries for medication provided under the plan they have selected; or pharmacies that provide a different drug than the one prescribed by the physician. Examples of Medicare fraud include incorrect reporting of diagnoses or procedures to maximize payments; billing for services, medical supplies, equipment or medications not provided; misrepresentation of the dates and descriptions of services or medications provided, the identity of the recipient or the individual furnishing services; and billing for noncovered or nonchargeable services as covered items. Also included are programs that provide consumer education, counseling and assistance with the objective of helping people identify instances of fraud.
  • Medicare Information/Counseling (27)
    LH-3500.5000

    Medicare Information/Counseling

    LH-3500.5000

    Programs that offer information and guidance for older adults and people with disabilities regarding their health insurance options with the objective of empowering them to make informed choices. Included is information about the eligibility requirements for Medicare; selection and enrollment in a Medicare prescription drug plan; benefits covered (and not covered) by the program; the payment process; the rights of beneficiaries; the process for determinations, coverage denials and appeals; consumer safeguards; and options for filling the gap in Medicare coverage. These programs also provide counseling and assistance about the subsidies that are available to low income beneficiaries enrolled in the Part D Prescription Drug Benefit; and may also provide information about Medicaid and the linkages between the two programs, referrals to appropriate state and local agencies involved in the Medicaid program, information about other Medicare-related entities (such as peer review organizations, Medicare-approved prescription drug plans, fiscal intermediaries and carriers), and assistance in completing Medicare insurance forms.
  • Occupational Therapy (20)
    LR-6200

    Occupational Therapy

    LR-6200

    Programs that evaluate the task performance skills of individuals who may be having difficulty engaging in self-care, work, play or leisure time activities and help people across the lifespan participate in the things they want and need to do through the therapeutic use of everyday activities (occupations). Occupational therapy services typically include an individualized evaluation, during which the individual/family and occupational therapist agree on the person's goals; customized intervention to improve the person's ability to perform daily activities and reach their goals; and an outcomes evaluation to ensure that the goals are being met. Common occupational therapy interventions include helping children with disabilities to participate fully in school and social situations, helping people recovering from injury to regain skills, and providing supports for older adults experiencing physical and cognitive changes.
  • Older Adult/Aging Issues (1)
    YZ-6100

    Older Adult/Aging Issues

    YZ-6100

    Programs that provide information and/or services that deal with the topic of older adults and their interests.
  • Older Adult/Disability Related Supportive Housing (4)
    BH-8400.6000

    Older Adult/Disability Related Supportive Housing

    BH-8400.6000

    Residential facilities for older adults and/or people with disabilities who are unable to function in an independent living environment because they need assistance with toileting, bathing, dressing, medication management and administration, meals and housekeeping and other activities of daily living, but do not require nursing care on a regular basis. Living options range from state institutions for individuals with the most severe disabilities who require intensive services to settings that enable individuals with disabilities to live with their own families or in their own homes or apartments with supportive services from community-based supported living providers. Alternatives in between include health care facilities for people with a primary need for developmental services in combination with an intermittent need for skilled nursing care; community care facilities (residential care homes or group homes) for people who require varying levels of supervision and assistance in the activities of daily living; assisted living facilities; continuing care retirement communities; life care communities; foster family placements for adults who will benefit from interaction in a family environment; and semi-independent living facilities for individuals with disabilities who need minimal levels of support to live and work in the community. Some of these facilities are licensed by the state.
  • Older Adults (60)
    YB-8000

    Older Adults

    YB-8000

    Individuals who are age 50, 55, 60, 62 or 65 or older depending on the minimum age for qualifying as an older adult which varies by program.
  • Personal Alarm Systems (4)
    PH-1800.6260

    Personal Alarm Systems

    PH-1800.6260

    Programs that provide electronic equipment which connects frail elderly individuals, people who have disabilities or people at risk of violence from an ex-partner with the police, participating hospitals, paramedics or other sources of emergency assistance.
  • Personal Care (7)
    PH-3300.6500

    Personal Care

    PH-3300.6500

    Programs that offer the services of paraprofessional aides who provide assistance with personal hygiene (bathing, grooming and mouth care), clothing care, ambulation, seating, toileting, housekeeping (changing bed linens or other chores that are essential to the individual's health and comfort), food preparation and nutritional and environmental support for recently discharged hospital patients, elderly people and people with disabilities in their own homes or other settings. Personal care may also include supervision which involves cueing, reminding, prompting or directing daily activities, as needed, but does not include medical services.
  • Physical Therapy (21)
    LR-6600

    Physical Therapy

    LR-6600

    Programs that evaluate joint motion, muscle strength and endurance, heart and lung function and the ability of people to perform activities of daily living; and utilize the therapeutic properties of exercise, heat, cold, electricity, ultraviolet, water, manipulation and massage to improve circulation, strengthen muscles, reduce pain and restore mobility to people who have been disabled by a stroke, arthritis, back or spinal cord injuries or other debilitating conditions. Physical therapists practice in a variety of settings including hospitals, private offices, outpatient clinics, rehabilitation centers, developmental centers, home health agencies, schools and pediatric centers.
  • Respite Care (3)
    PH-7000

    Respite Care

    PH-7000

    Programs that provide a brief period of relief or rest for family members, guardians or other people who are regular caregivers for dependent adults or children by offering temporary or intermittent care in the home or in community settings/facilities.
  • RSVP Program (2)
    ND-9200.8000-700

    RSVP Program

    ND-9200.8000-700

    Programs that provide part-time opportunities for individuals age 55 and older to serve in a diverse range of nonprofit organizations, public agencies, and faith-based organizations where they may mentor at-risk youth, organize neighborhood watch programs, test drinking water for contaminants, teach English to immigrants, lend their business skills to community groups that provide critical social services, or engage in other activities that benefit the communities in which they live. RSVP volunteers receive no stipend for their work but may be reimbursed for meals and transportation. Local organizations, both public and private, receive grants to sponsor and operate RSVP projects in their community. The RSVP Program is part of Senior Corps, a network of programs administered by the Corporation for National and Community Service.
  • Semi-Independent Living Residences for Adults With Disabilities (3)
    BH-8400.6000-800

    Semi-Independent Living Residences for Adults With Disabilities

    BH-8400.6000-800

    Programs that provide housing in a group setting for adults with developmental disabilities, sensory impairments, physical disabilities, emotional disabilities or multiple disabilities in facilities like small homes, apartment buildings, condominiums or agency-owned complexes which may be staffed to provide functional skills training and on-site supportive services. Residents generally have basic self-help skills or take responsibility for employing and supervising aides to assist them in meeting their personal needs. Staff may be available on a 24-hour basis or only occasionally depending on the specific needs of residents. Included are short-term transitional programs for people who are preparing for supported or totally independent living as well as long-term programs for people who may want to be permanent residents.
  • Senior Advocacy Groups (6)
    TD-1600.3100-800

    Senior Advocacy Groups

    TD-1600.3100-800

    Organizations that support the passage and enforcement of laws and other social measures that protect and promote the rights and interests of older adults.
  • Senior Center Bus Services (13)
    BT-4500.4700-800

    Senior Center Bus Services

    BT-4500.4700-800

    Fixed-route bus transportation provided by senior centers for elderly participants in their programs who do not have any other means of reaching the center.
  • Senior Centers (41)
    TC-5500.8000

    Senior Centers

    TC-5500.8000

    Multipurpose centers that serve as focal points for older adults in the community and which offer, at a single location, a wide variety of services and activities that are needed by and of interest to this population.
  • Senior Companion Program (1)
    ND-9200.8000-800

    Senior Companion Program

    ND-9200.8000-800

    Programs that provide part-time opportunities for low-income individuals age 60 and older to serve one-on-one with frail elderly and other homebound persons who have difficulty completing everyday tasks. They assist with grocery shopping, bill paying, and transportation to medical appointments, and alert doctors and family members to potential problems. Senior Companions also provide short periods of relief to primary caregivers. Senior companions receive a modest tax-free stipend for their work as well as reimbursement for transportation, annual physical examinations, meals, and accident and liability insurance during service. Local nonprofit organizations and public agencies receive grants to sponsor and operate Senior Companion projects. The Senior Companion Program is part of Senior Corps, a network of programs administered by the Corporation for National and Community Service.
  • Senior Corps Volunteer Programs (1)
    ND-9200.8000

    Senior Corps Volunteer Programs

    ND-9200.8000

    A network of programs including Foster Grandparents, Senior Companions and RSVP (Retired and Senior Volunteer Program) that tap the experience, skills and talents of older adults to meet community challenges. Senior Corp volunteers assist local nonprofits, public agencies, and faith-based organizations in carrying out their missions in all 50 states.
  • Senior Housing Information and Referral (12)
    BH-8500.8000

    Senior Housing Information and Referral

    BH-8500.8000

    Programs that maintain information about retirement residences, residential care facilities and nursing homes, and link older adults who are looking for alternative living options with appropriate independent or supervised living resources.
  • Senior Ride Programs (28)
    BT-4500.6500-800

    Senior Ride Programs

    BT-4500.6500-800

    Programs that provide door-to-door (or curb-to-curb) transportation for purposes of medical appointments, shopping, banking, social events, and other similar activities for older adults who need special accommodations and are unable to utilize other available means of transportation.
  • Supported Living Services for Adults With Disabilities (3)
    BH-8400.6000-840

    Supported Living Services for Adults With Disabilities

    BH-8400.6000-840

    Programs for adults with developmental disabilities, sensory impairments, physical disabilities, emotional problems or multiple disabilities who do not require 24-hour supervision that provide a highly individualized, coordinated system of services and supports which facilitates their ability to live in their own homes or apartments, to hire and supervise paid caregivers, to work in the community, to participate in community activities and to interact with nondisabled neighbors. A supported living agency may help the individual hire and supervise an attendant; develop a budget and pay bills on time; learn to shop and cook or hire someone to prepare meals for them; remember to take necessary medication; schedule medical appointments and get to the doctor's office; advertise for and select a roommate; make their living space barrier-free; learn about relationships, sexuality and parenting; select recreational pursuits that are personally satisfying; and accomplish other similar activities of daily living.
  • Terminal Illness (7)
    YF-8500

    Terminal Illness

    YF-8500

    An illness which, because of its nature, can be expected to cause the individual to die.
 
Processing...


Driving Walking/Biking Public Transit  Get Directions