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Crisis & Emergency Services

    Results: 27

  • 911 Services (63)
    JR-6000

    911 Services

    JR-6000

    Programs that operate a telephone response service staffed by trained personnel who assess requests for emergency assistance and dispatch the appropriate emergency response agency (law enforcement, fire, paramedics/EMTs or ambulance services, the latter per a contract with the municipality).
  • Clothing (96)
    BM-6500.1500

    Clothing

    BM-6500.1500

    Programs that pay for or provide new or secondhand clothing. Included are clothing exchange programs.
  • Crisis Intervention (99)
    RP-1500

    Crisis Intervention

    RP-1500

    Programs that provide immediate assistance for people who are in acute emotional distress; who are or perceive themselves to be in life-threatening situations; who are a danger to themselves or to others; or who are hysterical, frightened or otherwise unable to cope with a problem that requires immediate action. The objective of crisis intervention is to defuse the critical nature of the situation, ensure the person's safety, and return the individual to a state of equilibrium in which he or she is capable of identifying and seeking solutions to the problem.
  • Crisis Nurseries/Child Care (1)
    BH-1800.1500-050

    Crisis Nurseries/Child Care

    BH-1800.1500-050

    Programs that provide temporary shelter/residential care for infants and children who are at risk for or who have experienced child abuse or neglect in the home or whose families are experiencing an emergency that makes it untenable for the child to remain in the home. Care is generally provided by licensed family child care homes that are available on a 24-hour basis when needed. Some providers are able to accommodate children to age 12 or 14 and will consider older children on a case-by-case basis, while others limit their services to very young children, generally from birth to age five or six.
  • Disaster Related Livestock Evacuation and Sheltering Assistance (1)
    TH-2600.1600-180

    Disaster Related Livestock Evacuation and Sheltering Assistance

    TH-2600.1600-180

    Community members who have the equipment and/or corral/pasture space to help evacuate livestock including cattle and horses (and the supplies they require) and provide a safe place to stay when a fire, flood or other emergency threatens. Included are pre-identified evacuation assistance resources that farmers, ranchers and others who keep livestock can make arrangements with in advance and those that arise and come to the rescue as the threatening situation develops. Resources may include fairgrounds, racetracks/show facilities, feed stores, Cooperative Extension offices and concerned individuals with land outside the danger area.
  • Disaster Services (207)
    TH

    Disaster Services

    TH

    Public and private programs that provide emergency planning, preparedness, mitigation, response, relief and/or recovery services prior to, during and after a major fire, flood, hurricane, earthquake, tornado, tsunami, volcanic eruption, landslide, mudslide, snowstorm, drought, famine, explosion or nuclear accident, the outbreak of civil unrest, or other large-scale emergency of natural or human origin that disrupts the normal functioning of a community; or a localized incident such as a house fire which has made residents homeless. There are four recognized phases of disaster work: preparedness, mitigation, response and recovery. Many community agencies add disaster relief as a phase during response and early recovery.
  • Domestic Violence Hotlines (11)
    RP-1500.1400-200

    Domestic Violence Hotlines

    RP-1500.1400-200

    Programs that provide immediate assistance for women and men who have experienced domestic abuse which may include steps to ensure the person's safety; short-term emotional support; assistance with shelter; legal information and advocacy; referrals for medical treatment; ongoing counseling and/or group support; and other related services. Hotline staff are generally available via telephone, email, chat and/or text.
  • Domestic Violence Motel Vouchers (1)
    BH-1800.1500-080

    Domestic Violence Motel Vouchers

    BH-1800.1500-080

    Programs that provide people who are experiencing domestic violence with a temporary place to stay (usually one to three nights), generally utilizing a hotel or motel with which the referring agency has a prior agreement, but in some cases, temporary lodging selected by the individual.
  • Domestic Violence Shelters (7)
    BH-1800.1500-100

    Domestic Violence Shelters

    BH-1800.1500-100

    Programs that provide temporary emergency shelter for individuals, primarily women, who have experienced domestic violence/abuse, and for their children. Such facilities usually provide in-house individual, group and family counseling and the full range of secondary services related to domestic violence including referral to appropriate resources. Also included are similar facilities for battered men and those that can accommodate both men and women, where they are available.
  • Emergency Generators (1)
    BM-1750

    Emergency Generators

    BM-1750

    Programs that pay for or provide portable generators which allow access to power when there are outages.
  • Emergency Medical Care (45)
    LD

    Emergency Medical Care

    LD

    Programs that provide immediate short-term assistance for accident victims and acutely ill or injured individuals who are in pain, or whose health or lives may be in jeopardy.
  • Emergency Rescue (1)
    JR-1800

    Emergency Rescue

    JR-1800

    Programs that provide emergency rescue operations and/or lifesaving activities for people who are stranded, lost, accident victims or exposed to other life threatening dangers.
  • Fire Services (73)
    JR-1900

    Fire Services

    JR-1900

    Programs that are responsible for preventing, investigating, controlling and extinguishing fires. Activities include fire safety education, firefighting, investigating the causes of suspicious fires, maintaining equipment and trained firefighters necessary for a quick and efficient response to fires when they occur, and enforcing fire codes which protect lives and property from fires and explosions arising from the storage, handling and use of hazardous substances, materials and devices, or from conditions hazardous to life and property in the use or occupancy of buildings or other premises.
  • Fire Stations (71)
    JR-1950

    Fire Stations

    JR-1950

    Locations throughout the community which house fire equipment and personnel.
  • Food Pantries (303)
    BD-1800.2000

    Food Pantries

    BD-1800.2000

    Programs that acquire food products through donations, canned food drives, food bank programs or direct purchase and distribute the food to people who are in emergency situations. Some pantries deliver food to people whose disabilities or illnesses make it difficult for them to leave home.
  • Food Stamps/SNAP (68)
    NL-6000.2000

    Food Stamps/SNAP

    NL-6000.2000

    A federally-funded program administered locally by the county or the state that enables low-income and indigent households to obtain an electronic benefit transfer (EBT) card similar to a bank debit card which can be used in most grocery stores to purchase food. Approved households are entitled to purchase a designated amount of food utilizing their cards based on net income and household size. Benefits are generally available in an EBT account within 30 days from the date an application was filed. Expedited food stamps are available within seven days for people who are in an emergency situation and whose income and spendable resources for that month are within specified limits.
  • Homeless Drop In Centers (6)
    BH-1800.3500

    Homeless Drop In Centers

    BH-1800.3500

    Centers where homeless people can spend time during the day or evening. Services may include counseling and/or medication monitoring on a formal or informal basis; personal hygiene supplies; facilities for showering, shaving, napping, laundering clothes, making necessary telephone calls or attending to other personal needs; and other basic supportive services. Some centers may also provide meals or facilities for cooking. Programs that focus on homeless youth may provide case management, living skills training, family reunification assistance, classes and other educational supports, pre-employment training, health education (including HIV prevention), help in obtaining valid ID and other services that help youth successfully exit street life and transition to independent living.
  • Homeless Shelter (31)
    BH-1800.8500

    Homeless Shelter

    BH-1800.8500

    Programs that provide a temporary place to stay (usually three days to two weeks), generally in dormitory-style facilities with very little privacy, for people who have no permanent housing. Also included are programs that provide motel vouchers for people who are homeless.
  • Mental Health Crisis Lines (3)
    RP-1500.1400-500

    Mental Health Crisis Lines

    RP-1500.1400-500

    Programs that provide immediate assistance for people experiencing a mental health crisis such as a psychotic episode with the objective of defusing the crisis, often working closely with mobile crisis teams on standby, and helping the person develop a plan to link with resources for ongoing assistance, if required. A mental health crisis is a non-life threatening situation in which an individual exhibits extreme emotional disturbance or behavioral distress, is considering harm to him or herself or others, is disoriented or out of touch with reality, has a compromised ability to function, or is otherwise agitated and unable to be calmed. Other common indicators include feelings of intense sadness or depression, sleeping or eating problems, anxiety, severe distress, grief, anger or aggression, scattered, unfocused thinking, self-doubt, loss of motivation, lack of patience or irritability and paranoia. The service is generally available via telephone, email, chat and/or text.
  • Post Disaster Mental Health Services (3)
    TH-2600.6500

    Post Disaster Mental Health Services

    TH-2600.6500

    Programs that provide a variety of services following or in the midst of a major disaster or large-scale emergency which help individuals cope with their own psychological reactions to the incident and/or prepare them to provide emotional support for family members, friends and neighbors who are feeling frightened, confused and no longer in control of their lives because of the event.
  • Runaway/Youth Shelters (3)
    BH-1800.1500-700

    Runaway/Youth Shelters

    BH-1800.1500-700

    Programs that provide temporary emergency shelter for children and youth who have run away from or have been pushed out of their homes or who are acting out and at risk for abuse pending return to their own families or suitable alternative placement. Such facilities usually provide in-house individual, group and family counseling and the full range of other secondary services related to runaways including referral to appropriate resources.
  • Sack Lunches/Dinners (8)
    BD-1800.8000

    Sack Lunches/Dinners

    BD-1800.8000

    Programs that provide lunch or dinner in a small bag for people who would not otherwise have a meal. The program may target homeless or low-income people or other specific groups.
  • Safe Houses (3)
    BH-1800.1500-750

    Safe Houses

    BH-1800.1500-750

    Networks of people who are willing to provide short or long-term shelter in private homes, places of worship or other facilities for individuals experiencing domestic violence, sexual assault survivors, undocumented people and others who are fleeing a dangerous or threatening situation and who have no other safe alternatives. These homes or facilities may also provide for the basic subsistence needs of residents including food, clothing and, in some cases, a variety of social services. Also included are organizations that refer people who are in need of this service to the nearest safe house.
  • Substance Use Disorder Hotlines (3)
    RX-8470.8350

    Substance Use Disorder Hotlines

    RX-8470.8350

    Programs that provide immediate assistance for people who have problems related to excessive use of alcohol and/or use of other drugs or are at risk of a substance use related disorder. Services may include defusing the crisis, ensuring the person's safety and information about alternatives the person may explore to begin recovering. Substance use related hotlines are also typically available to significant others of people who are involved with drugs and/or excessive alcohol use. Hotline staff can generally be reached via the telephone, email, live chat, texting and/or instant message (IM).
  • Suicide Prevention Hotlines (6)
    RP-1500.1400-800

    Suicide Prevention Hotlines

    RP-1500.1400-800

    Programs that provide immediate assistance for individuals who are having suicidal feelings with the objective of helping them explore alternatives to self-harm or self-destruction. Suicide prevention workers establish and maintain contact with the individual while identifying and clarifying the focal problem, evaluate the suicidal potential, assess the individual's strengths and resources, and mobilize available resources including paramedic or police intervention and emergency psychiatric care as needed. These programs can also help individuals who are worried about the potentially suicidal behavior of another with the objective of helping them identify warning signs and provide options on seeking further help. Hotline staff are generally available via telephone, email, chat and/or text.
  • Transitional Housing/Shelter (34)
    BH-8600

    Transitional Housing/Shelter

    BH-8600

    Programs that provide extended shelter and supportive services primarily for homeless individuals and/or families with the goal of helping them live independently and transition into permanent housing. Some programs require that the individual/family be transitioning from a short-term emergency shelter. The length of stay varies considerably by program. It is generally longer than two weeks but typically 60 days or more and, in many cases, up to two years or more. The supportive services may be provided directly by the organization managing the housing or may be coordinated by them and provided by other public or private agencies. Transitional housing/shelter is generally provided in apartment style facilities with a higher degree of privacy than short-term homeless shelters; may be provided at no cost to the resident; and may be configured for specialized groups within the homeless population such as people with substance abuse problems, homeless mentally ill, homeless domestic violence victims, veterans or homeless people with AIDS/HIV. In some cases, a "transition in place" option allows families to continue living in the same complex (if not the same unit) where their transitional housing unit is located when they are ready to move to permanent housing. In other cases, the permanent housing option is either public housing or private rental housing supported by a tenant-based voucher subsidy. Included are post-domestic violence shelter housing programs that make affordable rental housing (or other accommodations) available to women, generally those who are coming directly out of a domestic violence shelter or other crisis shelter, often in apartment complexes owned by the shelter; and programs that provide transitional housing and support services for other targeted groups such as military and veteran families and others who need a temporary supportive living environment to maintain stability and begin to thrive.
  • Veteran/Military Hotlines (6)
    RP-1500.1400-900

    Veteran/Military Hotlines

    RP-1500.1400-900

    Programs that provide confidential assistance for military personnel and veterans who are emotionally distressed with the objective of defusing the crisis, ensuring the person's safety and helping the person to take the next immediate steps toward resolving the problem. Trained staff are generally available via telephone, email, chat and/or text. Most military/veteran hotlines are also available to family members who are concerned about a loved one.