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Children & Youth

    Results: 26

  • Adoption Services (34)
    PH-0300

    Adoption Services

    PH-0300

    Programs that participate in arranging permanent homes under new legal parentage for individuals whose birth parents are unable or unwilling to provide for their care. Included are programs that provide counseling and assistance for people who decide to relinquish their children for adoption or arrange for an independent adoption; which recruit, select, counsel and match suitable adoptive parents with children who have been relinquished; which assist in the adoption of stepchildren, adults or foreign-born children; which provide foster care for children who have been relinquished for adoption but not yet placed; and/or which assist people who are adopted to locate their birth parents and birth parents to locate the children they relinquished.
  • At Risk Families (6)
    YJ-0500.0300

    At Risk Families

    YJ-0500.0300

    Families who, because of their economic or environmental situation or history or a health problem or disability, are considered more likely than others to follow a generational pattern of self-destructive behavior, criminal activity, gang involvement, substance abuse, child abuse, welfare dependency, chronic unemployment, homelessness, unwanted pregnancy and other problems which threaten the health, safety and/or personal development of family members.
  • Bullying Prevention (3)
    FN-1500.1000

    Bullying Prevention

    FN-1500.1000

    Programs that attempt to reduce the incidence of bullying, a form of violence among children, on school playgrounds, in neighborhoods and in homes, through a variety of interventions which may include use of an anonymous questionnaire to assess the nature and prevalence of the problem, development and announcement of an intervention program, open discussions of bullying at school and in other venues, increased supervision of children in areas that are "hotspots" for bullying, arrangements for reporting bullying incidents, immediate intervention when bullying incidents occur, development of protective strategies for targets, formation of support groups for victims of bullies, discussions with parents of involved students, and engagement of community members in support of the program. Most bullying prevention programs are school based and target students in elementary, middle and junior high schools. Bullying can be physical, verbal, or psychological; and involves intentional, repeated hurtful acts, words and other behavior such as name-calling, threatening or shunning committed by one or more children against another child.
  • Child Abuse Medical Evaluations (1)
    LF-7000.1550

    Child Abuse Medical Evaluations

    LF-7000.1550

    Hospitals and clinics with multidisciplinary teams that conduct historical interviews and physical examinations of children to determine whether there are injuries or other forms of physical evidence that are consistent with neglect, emotional deprivation/failure to thrive, or physical or sexual abuse that constitute the battered child syndrome. Historical information supplied by the child in the medical interview may be used to establish a case for child abuse even in the absence of physical evidence.
  • Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (8)
    RP-6400.1500

    Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

    RP-6400.1500

    Programs that are staffed by licensed physicians who specialize in the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of disorders of thinking, feeling and behavior affecting children, adolescents and their families. Services include an assessment that involves a detailed exploration of current concerns about the child or adolescent's emotional or behavioral problems, physical health and development, history of parental care (including possible abuse), family relationships and any history of parental/familial mental illness; and a variety of treatment options that may include psychotherapy, medication and/or consultation with other physicians or professionals from schools, juvenile courts, social agencies or other community organizations.
  • Child Care Expense Assistance (37)
    NL-3000.1500

    Child Care Expense Assistance

    NL-3000.1500

    Programs that cover all or part of the cost of child care in public and licensed private child care centers or private family child care homes, usually for low-income families or families which include children with disabilities in situations where parents are working, in school or in a training program. Also included are programs that pay the costs of in-home or out-of-home child care when the parent is receiving diagnostic tests, undergoing medical treatment, is hospitalized or needs to be out of the house for other reasons; and those that provide financial assistance to families with young children to help cover some of the costs of a parent staying home to care for their child.
  • Child Care Mental Health Consultation Programs (1)
    PH-2360.1500

    Child Care Mental Health Consultation Programs

    PH-2360.1500

    Programs that provide problem-solving consultation and advice for parents and child care providers to support children who are experiencing behavioral or emotional challenges in their child care setting that put them at risk for losing access to their child care. The program aims to ensure the success of all children in child care and increase the number of families and child care providers who effectively nurture the social and emotional development of young children in licensed child care programs. Services include observation and assessment, home visits, child care site visits, behavior management strategies for the child care setting and the home, adaptations in the child care environment, team planning and community referrals, and staff training. The programs differ from community to community in a number of ways including the type of services provided (behavioral-oriented versus therapy-oriented), the credentials of professionals providing the service (licensed therapists, behaviorists, early childhood specialists/educators), and the degree to which they work individually with children and families. They are generally implemented within a collaborative relationship between local community mental health agencies and local/regional child care resource and referral association offices, though other organizations may also be involved.
  • Child Health and Disability Prevention Exams (49)
    LF-7000.1600

    Child Health and Disability Prevention Exams

    LF-7000.1600

    Health care providers that offer the Child Health and Disability Prevention Program, a health assessment and treatment program for low-income children and youth through age 21 that is designed to assure early detection, diagnosis and treatment of diseases or impairments which might adversely affect the individual's growth and development. CHDP exams generally include a complete physical examination; a dental assessment; a nutritional assessment; vision and hearing screening; immunizations; urine, blood and tuberculosis screening tests; specialized laboratory tests, as needed; and health education on topics such as tobacco use prevention, lead poisoning prevention and other issues pertaining to child health.
  • Child Transportation Programs (4)
    BT-4500.6500-120

    Child Transportation Programs

    BT-4500.6500-120

    Programs that provide door-to-door (or curb-to-curb) transportation to help families who meet eligibility guidelines get their children to and from child care or children's activities when they are unable to do so on their own.
  • Children's Play Groups (1)
    PS-1500

    Children's Play Groups

    PS-1500

    Programs that provide regularly scheduled opportunities for children to engage in supervised play with one another.
  • Developmental Screening (5)
    LF-7000.1730

    Developmental Screening

    LF-7000.1730

    Programs that offer a procedure that is designed to identify children who should receive more intensive assessment or diagnosis for potential developmental delays. Screening tools can be specific to a disorder (e.g., autism), an area (e.g., cognitive development, language, or gross motor skills), or they may be general, encompassing multiple areas of concern; and rely heavily on parent observation. They do not provide conclusive evidence of developmental delays and do not result in diagnoses. A positive screening result should be followed by a thorough assessment. The goal of developmental screening is to allow for earlier detection of delays in order to improve child health and well-being for identified children.
  • Early Childhood Education (153)
    HD-1800

    Early Childhood Education

    HD-1800

    Programs that provide educational activities and experiences for children from birth to age five which are intended to foster social, physical, emotional and intellectual growth and prepare them for further formal learning.
  • Early Intervention for Children With Disabilities/Delays (18)
    LR-1700

    Early Intervention for Children With Disabilities/Delays

    LR-1700

    Programs that identify infants, toddlers and in some cases, preschoolers who show evidence of or are at risk for lags in physical development, cognitive development, language and speech development, psychosocial development or self-help skills, and provide or coordinate the delivery of an enrichment program in order to minimize the potential for a developmental delay and to meet their current developmental needs. The program may include early identification activities (child find); a developmental evaluation; a review of family concerns, priorities and resources; meetings with the family to develop an individualized family service plan; service coordination to ensure that the individual and his or her family receive needed services which may include but are not limited to physical therapy, occupational therapy, audiology, health/medical services, nursing services, nutrition services, psychological services including specialized play groups or therapy sessions, counseling, speech and language assistance, special instructional services, transportation, and parenting skills development; and ongoing evaluation of the child's progress and his or her changing enrichment needs. Included are "birth to three" programs and federal, state or local programs that address the needs of slightly older children or children not otherwise eligible for "birth to three" programs.
  • Early Intervention for Mental Illness (2)
    RR-1800

    Early Intervention for Mental Illness

    RR-1800

    Programs that identify and provide treatment for individuals whose personal condition and social experiences could potentially produce mental, emotional or social dysfunctions with the objective of preventing their development; or which conduct general screening efforts to identify and treat children who have emerging problems to ensure the best possible prognosis.
  • Family Life Education (1)
    PH-6200.2000

    Family Life Education

    PH-6200.2000

    Programs that offer educational workshops that cover a range of family-living issues and help participants develop the knowledge and skills they will need to better handle life transitions and crises, improve overall self-esteem, promote growth, strengthen coping mechanisms and avert situations that can lead to family dysfunction. Topics may include parenting and step parenting skills, human growth and development over a life span, the physiological and psychological aspects of human sexuality, communication skills, couple and family relations, stress management, intergenerational issues, elder care, family and community relations, family and work relations, the impact of money and time management on daily family life, personal development, self-discovery and self-motivation. Family life education programs are offered by a wide variety of organizations including social and community service agencies, hospitals, schools and after-school programs, employee assistance programs or wellness programs in business organizations, learning centers and religious institutions.
  • Infant and Early Childhood Mental Health (8)
    RP-6400.3300

    Infant and Early Childhood Mental Health

    RP-6400.3300

    Programs that specialize in providing preventive, diagnostic and treatment services that focus on strengthening the social and emotional development and well-being of infants and young children within the context of early primary relationships. Services may include emotional support, developmental guidance, early relationship assessment and support, infant-parent psychotherapy and advocacy. The objectives of the discipline are to help infants and young children develop close and secure relationships with others; experience, express and regulate a full range of both positive and negative emotions; and actively explore the environment and learn.
  • Intergenerational Programs (3)
    PS-3300

    Intergenerational Programs

    PS-3300

    Programs that increase cooperation, interaction or exchange between people of different generations dispelling stereotypes about old and young, and enabling individuals, families and communities to enjoy and benefit from the richness of an age-integrated society. Intergenerational programs are structured so that both age groups benefit from the interaction, but in many programs, one age group is the provider of service while the other is the recipient. Older people may mentor children or adolescents and serve as role models for young people who are preparing for adulthood, while students who understand the latest technology may teach older adults computer skills in their homes, senior centers or long term care settings. Older adults gain opportunities to develop meaningful contact with younger people and stay in touch with their communities while children and youth develop healthy attitudes about aging, gain an appreciation for rich cultural traditions and histories, and experience the satisfaction of sharing something they know. In many communities, young and old are working together as partners on community projects, and are finding that the collaboration leads to mutual appreciation while their communities reap the benefits of their work.
  • Juvenile Diversion (8)
    FF-0500.1800-350

    Juvenile Diversion

    FF-0500.1800-350

    Community-based programs that provide comprehensive social services for individuals younger than age 18 who have committed a minor offense and are directed to participate in a diversion program as an alternative to arrest, prosecution or, in some cases, sentencing for the offense. Most juvenile diversion programs do an assessment of the individual's needs and provide and/or coordinate the delivery of the necessary services which may include individual, group or family counseling, substance abuse counseling, supervised recreational activities, vocational guidance, tutorial services and supplemental referrals for other needs.
  • Mother and Infant Care (354)
    LJ-5000

    Mother and Infant Care

    LJ-5000

    Programs that prepare expectant mothers for childbirth and provide health care services for mothers and infants during pregnancy and following birth.
  • Parent Child Interactive Therapy (5)
    RP-1400.8000-645

    Parent Child Interactive Therapy

    RP-1400.8000-645

    Programs that offer PCIT, a behavior management program that helps parents learn new ways to eliminate destructive behaviors in young children such as physical aggression, swearing, defiance, and disrespect to adults. PCIT places emphasis on improving the quality of the parent-child relationship by changing parent-child interaction patterns. It combines one-on-one coaching for parents by a trained PCIT therapist using structured child-parent play activities. The therapist uses a two-way mirror to watch the family interact and provides continual, real-time feedback, directions and encouragement through a hearing-aid-size radio receiver worn by the parent. Parents are first taught how to give praise for positive behavior and, when the parent and child have mastered the skills and the relationship has improved, move to the second phase of the process where discipline is introduced for negative behaviors.
  • Parent/Child Activity Groups (2)
    PS-6500

    Parent/Child Activity Groups

    PS-6500

    Programs that provide regularly scheduled opportunities for parents to participate in a wide variety of recreational, arts and cultural activities with their youngsters. The experience provides a means for developing close family relationships at a stage in the child's life when quality time with their mother or father is essential for healthy development, and exposure to music, storytelling and similar pastimes can stir a child's imagination and spark their creativity. Other programs may focus on reading, games and early learning activities.
  • Parental Visitation Facilitation (4)
    PH-6000

    Parental Visitation Facilitation

    PH-6000

    Programs that facilitate parental visits with minor children in situations where the court has established conditions for the visit.
  • Placements for Children and Youth (14)
    PH-6300

    Placements for Children and Youth

    PH-6300

    Programs that provide alternative living arrangements for children and youth who have been neglected, abused or abandoned, who have had contact with the juvenile justice system, or who have a disability, and are no longer able to live with their families; or which conduct an evaluation of current placements to determine whether a change is warranted.
  • School Based Teen Parent/Pregnant Teen Programs (7)
    HH-7920

    School Based Teen Parent/Pregnant Teen Programs

    HH-7920

    Programs, usually available within the regular high school curriculum, that provide opportunities for pregnant teens and teenage students who are parents to complete their high school education and receive diplomas. Classes which focus on child development, infant care, mother/infant nutrition and childbirth preparation are available in addition to the basic graduation requirements and academic electives. Students who are enrolled in the program may also receive nutritionally balanced meals (breakfast and lunch), prenatal care, family planning and counseling services.
  • Specialized Pediatric Evaluation (1)
    LF-7000.8000

    Specialized Pediatric Evaluation

    LF-7000.8000

    Programs that conduct pediatric evaluations which are intended to confirm the presence in a child of a particular disease or condition.
  • Youth Development (122)
    PS-9800

    Youth Development

    PS-9800

    Programs that provide opportunities for children and youth to participate in a wide range of recreational, cultural, social and civic activities through membership in clubs, scout troops and other youth groups whose purpose is to help youngsters develop their potential and grow into healthy, educated, responsible and productive adults.